Publishers

Jun 2017
3
0
US
Hello,
I recently fine tuned a mathematical method that creates representations of the integrals of power functions with a tight degree of accuracy around 1% off of the real value at the point of max deviation. And had three questions that you would hopefully be able to answer for me:


1.) Do you believe that this is a significant enough of a finding to get published?


2.) If yes, where should I submit it to? I unfortunately finished it a year after finishing college but I started working on it in my freshman year.


3.) Where would I get a detailed review of the work? (I am pretty sure many people would rather not read a 50 page paper on a method that may or may not be significant.)
 

HallsofIvy

MHF Helper
Apr 2005
20,249
7,909
First, what do you mean by "fine tuned"? Second, are you talking about numerical integration? How is it different from the trapezoid rule or Simpson's rule? What, exactly, do you mean by "a tight degree of accuracy around 1% off of the real value at the point of max deviation"? Typically, the accuracy of numerical integration depends upon how small a "step" you use so on how much work you are willing to do. For most real applications, as opposed to text book exercises, 1% accuracy would be very bad.

Have you read many journals that have articles on integration so you can see what has been done and is being done?
 
Jun 2017
3
0
US
It is a method that produces an integral like ((x^3)/3) + c (the integral of x^2), except this method does it with power functions, without the use of complex components. Also it isn't 1% accurate, it is 1% deviation from the real, aka in the 99% and above accuracy range.
I haven't finished it yet, due to a transition region which is the main reason why my function is 1% off of the real at that location (keep in mind it is a difference of mine producing 1.01 and the computer program I use to generator the power values producing 1.00).