Intercepts

May 2010
52
0
(1) 4x-12 = 34

Graph line use intercepts if only 1 intercept exists use it and another point to draw the line.



(2) -25X + Y = 55

What is the Y intercept

What is the X intercept
 

pickslides

MHF Helper
Sep 2008
5,237
1,625
Melbourne
(1) 4x-12 = 34

Graph line use intercepts if only 1 intercept exists use it and another point to draw the line.
\(\displaystyle 4x-12 = 34\)

\(\displaystyle 4x = 46\)

\(\displaystyle x = \frac{46}{4}\)


(2) -25X + Y = 55

What is the Y intercept

What is the X intercept
y-intercept make x = 0

\(\displaystyle -25X + Y = 55\)

\(\displaystyle -25\times 0 + Y = 55\)

Now solve for y



x-intercept make y = 0

\(\displaystyle -25X + Y = 55\)

\(\displaystyle -25X + 0 = 55\)

Now solve for x
 

Prove It

MHF Helper
Aug 2008
12,883
4,999
(1) 4x-12 = 34

Graph line use intercepts if only 1 intercept exists use it and another point to draw the line.



(2) -25X + Y = 55

What is the Y intercept

What is the X intercept
1. This is not the equation of a line.

2. To find the \(\displaystyle x\) intercept, let \(\displaystyle y = 0\) and solve for \(\displaystyle x\).

To find the \(\displaystyle y\) intercept, let \(\displaystyle x = 0\) and solve for \(\displaystyle y\).
 
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Reactions: downthesun01
Oct 2009
303
33
(1) Solving for x will give you your x-intercept. Since there is no y, it's obvious that this is a vertical (|) line running parallel to the x-axis.

(2)To find the x-intercept set y=0 and solve for x.

So,

\(\displaystyle -25x+(0)=55\) Solve for x

To find the y-intercepts set x=0 and solve for y.

So,

\(\displaystyle -25(0)+y=55\) Solve for y.

Hope that helps
 

Prove It

MHF Helper
Aug 2008
12,883
4,999
Or maybe the equation of a vertical line?
True, but that's not what the question sounds like...

From the sound of the question, there should be an equation of the form \(\displaystyle y = mx + c\), so that you can graph it either using the intercepts, or the \(\displaystyle y\)-intercept and gradient.
 

pickslides

MHF Helper
Sep 2008
5,237
1,625
Melbourne
True, but that's not what the question sounds like...

From the sound of the question, there should be an equation of the form \(\displaystyle y = mx + c\), so that you can graph it either using the intercepts, or the \(\displaystyle y\)-intercept and gradient.
Agreed. It does seem like a strange one to be asked.