Graphing Polar Coordinates

May 2010
5
0
So I have a worksheet that asks me to graph a function on my calculator and then give values for every value of \(\displaystyle \pi/12\) between 0 and \(\displaystyle 2\pi\).

My question is, do you guys get r values that are extremely close to 6? My graphing calculator (TI-84 Silver Plus) gives me that for every \(\displaystyle \theta\) value from 0 to \(\displaystyle 2\pi\).

Here is the equation:

\(\displaystyle r = 2 + 4\cos\theta\)

My book gives an example of what the graph should look like for the model equation \(\displaystyle r = a \pm b\cos\theta\) when 0 < a < b, and is described as a Limaçon with an inner loop.

In essence, amidoinitrite?
 

Opalg

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Aug 2007
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Leeds, UK
So I have a worksheet that asks me to graph a function on my calculator and then give values for every value of \(\displaystyle \pi/12\) between 0 and \(\displaystyle 2\pi\).

My question is, do you guys get r values that are extremely close to 6? My graphing calculator (TI-84 Silver Plus) gives me that for every \(\displaystyle \theta\) value from 0 to \(\displaystyle 2\pi\).

Here is the equation:

\(\displaystyle r = 2 + 4\cos\theta\)

My book gives an example of what the graph should look like for the model equation \(\displaystyle r = a \pm b\cos\theta\) when 0 < a < b, and is described as a Limaçon with an inner loop.

In essence, amidoinitrite?
Have you set your calculator to radians? It looks as though you may be using degrees, which is not what the question wants.