Formula Help

May 2010
3
0
Hello,

I am very rusty with my math and was wondering if I can get some help with this formula?

I need to compute: x = (n(n-7)^2)

These are the instructions to be used with this formula:

As soon as you get your first win, begin counting your losses until you get another win and apply this formula:
let n = number of losses between the first and second win
Compute: x = (n(n-7)^2)
If x >= 90, move to step two
If x < 90, stay on step 1


Thanks for any and all help!
metny
 
Apr 2010
61
13
Prescott, Arizona
Hello,

I am very rusty with my math and was wondering if I can get some help with this formula?

I need to compute: x = (n(n-7)^2)

These are the instructions to be used with this formula:

As soon as you get your first win, begin counting your losses until you get another win and apply this formula:
let n = number of losses between the first and second win
Compute: x = (n(n-7)^2)
If x >= 90, move to step two
If x < 90, stay on step 1

Thanks for any and all help!
metny
metny: Can you be more specific? What exactly does the formula apply to? In the "instructions" the word "win" is used -- does the formula apply to some sort of game? Or what?
 
May 2010
3
0
Yes, this is a formula for a strategy guide for a computer game that I am interested in.

I am hoping that this formula and guide make sense? Trying to find out if this formula for the strategy guide actually works or not?
 
May 2010
3
0
Anyone know how to compute this formula? Would appreciate any help.

Thanks.
 
Apr 2010
61
13
Prescott, Arizona
Anyone know how to compute this formula? Would appreciate any help.

Thanks.
metny: First, to be sure -- below is the formula you want to comute. . .

\(\displaystyle (n(n-7)^2)\)

Assuming that is correct. . .

I would first compute \(\displaystyle (n-7)^2)\) and get. . .

\(\displaystyle (n^2-14n+49)\)

Then I would multiply \(\displaystyle (n^2-14n+49)\) by \(\displaystyle n\)

Resulting in a solution of. . .

\(\displaystyle n^3-14n^2+49n\)

Now, it is very possible that I could be mistaken. I have not checked my work (Bad Dean!). So, you need to check me by giving \(\displaystyle n\) some arbitrary value, say \(\displaystyle 3\) and doing the calculation.