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Math Help - Help with answer?

  1. #1
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    Help with answer?

    y=sin2x

    1)What does the 2 indicate?

    2) Is the period \pi?

    3) Where are its zeroes?
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by crosser43 View Post
    y=sin2x

    1)What does the 2 indicate?

    2) Is the period \pi?

    3) Where are its zeroes?
    Hi crosser43,

    In y=\sin bx, b indicates the period of the sine curve.

    In y=\sin 2x, the period is 2.

    The period of the sine curve is the length of one cycle of the curve. The natural period of the sine curve is 2\pi. So, a coefficient of b=1 is equivalent to a period of 2\pi.

    To get the period of the sine curve for any coefficient b, just divide 2\pi by the coefficient b to get the new period of the curve.

    So, the period of y=\sin 2x is \frac{2\pi}{2}=\pi


    The coefficient b and the period of the sine curve have an inverse relationship, so as b gets smaller, the length of one cycle of the curve gets bigger. Likewise, as you increase b, the period will decrease.

    The zeros of the curve in the interval 0 \le x \le 2\pi are \{0, \frac{\pi}{2}, \pi , \frac{3\pi}{2}, 2\pi\}.

    Just click on the attachments. They should clear up (I hope).
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Help with answer?-picture-period-sinx.gif   Help with answer?-diagram-graph-period-sin2x.gif  
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