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Math Help - identity

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Jun 2008
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    51

    identity

    proving identity
    \frac {(1 + cosx + sinx)}{( 1 + cosx - sinx)} = \frac{ cos x (1 + sin x)} { (1 - sin^2 x)}<br />
    sorry my mistake.
    Last edited by z1llch; July 20th 2009 at 04:31 AM.
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  2. #2
    Super Member
    Joined
    May 2009
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    I assume that you mean this:
    \frac{1 + \cos x + \sin x}{1 - \cos x + \sin x} = \frac{\cos x(1 + \sin x)}{1 - \sin^2 x}

    (Either learn LaTex or use parentheses properly, please!)

    First of all, the right side is not simplified:
    \frac{\cos x(1 + \sin x)}{1 - \sin^2 x}
    \begin{aligned}<br />
&= \frac{\cos x(1 + \sin x)}{\cos^2 x} \\<br />
&= \frac{1 + \sin x}{\cos x}<br />
\end{aligned}

    If you do this, then this problem is the exact same one I solved earlier for arze in this thread: http://www.mathhelpforum.com/math-he...255-prove.html.


    01
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  3. #3
    Junior Member
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    Jun 2008
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    did tried to use conjugate. but couldnt simplify it..
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