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Math Help - Trigonometry with minutes

  1. #1
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    Trigonometry with minutes

    Hi guys, i have a maths worksheet that is due in tomorrow and i cant remember how to do some of the questions. The question reads: Find the size of the angle θ, correct to the nearest minute, in cach of the following.

    I have a right-angled triangle with the value of the opposite angle as 27m, and the adjacent angle as 32m, with the hypotenuse having no value. this indicates that i have to use the Tangent function. How would i go about solving this?

    (I dont actually need the answer, just the method.)
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcaelli View Post
    Hi guys, i have a maths worksheet that is due in tomorrow and i cant remember how to do some of the questions. The question reads: Find the size of the angle θ, correct to the nearest minute, in cach of the following.

    I have a right-angled triangle with the value of the opposite angle as 27m, and the adjacent angle as 32m, with the hypotenuse having no value.
    No. You don't. An angle of "27m" makes no sense, that's a length measurement. You have a triangle with [b]legs[b] of length 27 m and 32 m. The hypotenuse certainly DOES have a value- you just aren't given it. You could calculate it by using the Pythagorean theorem but don't, it is not necessary for this problem.

    this indicates that i have to use the Tangent function. How would i go about solving this?

    (I dont actually need the answer, just the method.)
    Do you at least remember that "tan= opposite side/adjacent side"? Since you are given those lengths, divide to find the tangent of the angle and then take the inverse tangent or 'arctangent", presumably on your calculator. Be sure your calculator is in "degree" mode. Your calculator will probably give you a decimal answer. Since there are 60 minutes in one degree, multiply the decimal part by 60 to find the minutes.
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  3. #3
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    Right, sorry im a bit tired at the moment. I knew pretty much all of that except for the fact about there being 60 minutes in one degree, i think i must have missed that lesson. thanks for the help, i know what to do now.
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