Results 1 to 6 of 6

Math Help - tan(10pi/3)

  1. #1
    Member
    Joined
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    77

    tan(10pi/3)

    isn't tan(10pi/3) supposed to be sqrt(3).. ?
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
    Joined
    Feb 2007
    From
    New York, USA
    Posts
    11,663
    Thanks
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by weasley74 View Post
    isn't tan(10pi/3) supposed to be sqrt(3).. ?
    yes

    you could have checked that on your calculator, you know
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    Bar0n janvdl's Avatar
    Joined
    Apr 2007
    From
    South Africa
    Posts
    1,630
    Thanks
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by Jhevon View Post
    you could have checked that on your calculator, you know
    In my mathematics course, no calculators are allowed at all. They're like completely "banned". You may not even multiply or add or do anything similar with it. Might be the same case here. Where you actually have to show all of your steps.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    Member
    Joined
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    77
    yeah, calculators not allowed..
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  5. #5
    Bar0n janvdl's Avatar
    Joined
    Apr 2007
    From
    South Africa
    Posts
    1,630
    Thanks
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by weasley74 View Post
    isn't tan(10pi/3) supposed to be sqrt(3).. ?
    \frac{10 \pi }{3} = 3 \pi + \frac{ \pi }{3}
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  6. #6
    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
    Joined
    Feb 2007
    From
    New York, USA
    Posts
    11,663
    Thanks
    3
    no calculators, no problem!

    you should know \tan \frac {\pi}3 by heart, or know how to get is from the sine and cosine of pi/3

    then, by reference angles, \tan \frac {k \pi}3 = \pm \tan \frac {\pi}3

    the sign depends on what quadrant the angle \frac {k \pi}3 is. \frac {10 \pi}3 is in the third quadrant, so we take the plus sign
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum