Results 1 to 11 of 11
Like Tree1Thanks
  • 1 Post By skeeter

Math Help - Equation of axis of a periodic function!

  1. #1
    Super Member sakonpure6's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 2012
    From
    Canada
    Posts
    504
    Thanks
    41

    Equation of axis of a periodic function!

    I am confused on how to find it. Is it the amplitude of the periodic function or what?

    For instance i have a periodic function that is 6m between two points so amplitude = 3 and does that mean the equation of axis is y=3 ?

    any help is appreciated! and thanks in advance!
    Last edited by skeeter; November 28th 2012 at 04:04 PM.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    MHF Contributor
    skeeter's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2008
    From
    North Texas
    Posts
    12,125
    Thanks
    1009

    Re: Equation of axis of a periodic function!

    what is the function, specifically?
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    Super Member sakonpure6's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 2012
    From
    Canada
    Posts
    504
    Thanks
    41

    Re: Equation of axis of a periodic function!

    sin function for instance
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    MHF Contributor
    skeeter's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2008
    From
    North Texas
    Posts
    12,125
    Thanks
    1009

    Re: Equation of axis of a periodic function!

    depends on the vertical shift
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  5. #5
    Super Member sakonpure6's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 2012
    From
    Canada
    Posts
    504
    Thanks
    41

    Re: Equation of axis of a periodic function!

    Quote Originally Posted by skeeter View Post
    depends on the vertical shift
    the function starts at 1 goes up to 7 and back down to 1 in 8 seconds
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  6. #6
    MHF Contributor
    skeeter's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2008
    From
    North Texas
    Posts
    12,125
    Thanks
    1009

    Re: Equation of axis of a periodic function!

    I would imagine the axis of a periodic function (never heard it called this before) is the same as the midline ... y = 4 in the case you provided.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  7. #7
    Super Member sakonpure6's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 2012
    From
    Canada
    Posts
    504
    Thanks
    41

    Re: Equation of axis of a periodic function!

    how did u calculate y=4, because i got y=3 ( same as the amplitude? )
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  8. #8
    MHF Contributor
    skeeter's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2008
    From
    North Texas
    Posts
    12,125
    Thanks
    1009

    Re: Equation of axis of a periodic function!

    what value is halfway between y = 7 (max) and y = 1 (min) ?
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  9. #9
    Super Member sakonpure6's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 2012
    From
    Canada
    Posts
    504
    Thanks
    41

    Re: Equation of axis of a periodic function!

    3
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  10. #10
    MHF Contributor
    skeeter's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2008
    From
    North Texas
    Posts
    12,125
    Thanks
    1009

    Re: Equation of axis of a periodic function!

    how far is 3 from 7?

    how far is 3 from 1?

    are they equal?
    Thanks from sakonpure6
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  11. #11
    Super Member sakonpure6's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 2012
    From
    Canada
    Posts
    504
    Thanks
    41

    Re: Equation of axis of a periodic function!

    oh okay thank you!
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Replies: 2
    Last Post: July 2nd 2012, 12:40 PM
  2. Replies: 7
    Last Post: May 13th 2012, 12:37 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: September 12th 2010, 01:51 PM
  4. Replies: 7
    Last Post: March 6th 2010, 08:07 AM
  5. Average Value Function and Equivalent Periodic Function
    Posted in the Advanced Applied Math Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: February 14th 2010, 04:31 AM

/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum