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Math Help - Radians into my Calculator?!?

  1. #1
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    Radians into my Calculator?!?

    hey there

    My question is: why is it that when you have a radian value expressed as a decimal you do not need to specify it as a radian value in your calculator.

    So for example:

    Example: if the value was \pi/8 I would need to specify it was radians. But a value like 0.6 doesn't have to be specified...but it is still in radians.

    Can someone explain this to me please
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  2. #2
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    Re: Radians into my Calculator?!?

    Quote Originally Posted by Astar View Post
    My question is: why is it that when you have a radian value expressed as a decimal you do not need to specify it as a radian value in your calculator.
    In the expression \sin(\theta) the \theta is a real number.
    So the is no need to tell a calculator about real numbers. That is all a calculator knows. In fact, there are many who think that mathematics courses should abandon the so called degree as a totally archaic notion.
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  3. #3
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    Re: Radians into my Calculator?!?

    ok but why is it then that i have to specify radians if it is \pi/6 for example???
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  4. #4
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    Re: Radians into my Calculator?!?

    Quote Originally Posted by Astar View Post
    ok but why is it then that i have to specify radians if it is \pi/6 for example???
    You absolutely do no have to do that.
    I suppose some of the simple calculators still have a degree/radian mode.
    But they are really out of date.

    EDIT: P.S.
    Go to this website.
    You change the value of \frac{\pi}{3} without ever saying anything about radians.
    Last edited by Plato; June 24th 2011 at 03:06 PM.
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