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Math Help - A level Maths part 05

  1. #1
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    Wink A level Maths part 05

    thanks for everyone helping me i am really greatful ,and the explations are makiing understand more thank you ...i need help in this homework too ,and i need answers for all please..there is another part continued.

    regards
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  2. #2
    Grand Panjandrum
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    Quote Originally Posted by carlasader View Post
    thanks for everyone helping me i am really greatful ,and the explations are makiing understand more thank you ...i need help in this homework too ,and i need answers for all please..there is another part continued.

    regards



    1. Vector sum of forces:

    <br />
\bold{V} = (2\bold{i} + \bold{j}) + (3\bold{i} - 2\bold{j}) + (-\bold{i} -3\bold{j}) = (2+3-1) \bold{i} +(1-2-3)\bold{j} = 4 \bold{i} -4\bold{j} \mbox{ N}<br />

    The the acceleration \bold{a} = \bold{V}/m

    2. let the tension be \bold{T} then the total force on the first particel, and hence the acceleration is:

    <br />
\bold{T}-m_1\bold{g} = m_1 \bold{a_1}<br />

    and for the second particle:


    <br />
\bold{T}-m_2\bold{g} = m_2 \bold{a_2}<br />

    but \bold{a_2} = -\bold{a_1} so:

    <br />
\bold{T}/m_2-\bold{g} = -[\bold{T}/m_1-\bold{g}]<br />

    which can then b solved for \bold{T}

    RonL
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  3. #3
    Forum Admin topsquark's Avatar
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    Start by drawing a Free-Body-Diagram for the ball.

    I have a +x axis to the right and a +y axis upward. There is a weight (w) acting straight downward, a tension (T) acting at 50 degrees above the -x axis, and an applied force (F) of 50 N acting in the +x direction.

    Since the ball is in equilibrium we know that
    \sum F_x = 0
    \sum F_y = 0

    So:
    \sum F_x = -Tcos(50) + F = 0
    which implies
    T = \frac{F}{cos(50)} = \frac{50 \, N}{cos(50)} = 77.7862 \, N

    and
    \sum F_y = Tsin(50) - w = 0
    which implies
    w = Tsin(50) = \frac{F}{cos(50)} \cdot sin(50) = F tan(50)

     = (50 \, N)tan(50) = 59.5877 \, N

    -Dan
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  4. #4
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    Lightbulb thanks alot

    well i was having alittle trouble figuring out stuff ,thanks alot ...if u can help me with the rest of the problems i will be greatful ....thank you !!
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