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Math Help - Trigonometry,Pythagoras and Circle Theorem Question

  1. #1
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    Unhappy Trigonometry,Pythagoras and Circle Theorem Question


    I'm stuck on this question, trigonometry is the only thing in math that I really don't get.

    Some information for you:
    The angle in the triangle is 15 degrees if that's not clear.
    I need to find the area of the space between the edge of the triangle and the circle.
    That triangle is meant to start from the middle of the circle.
    I know that there is 24 of the triangles in the circle.

    Circumference of the circle is 40cm
    Diameter is 12.73(2 decimal places)
    Radius is 6.34

    I would like to know how to solve this, what the steps are so you don't just say i did this got this and then bam! Theres your answer.
    I want the whole lot, but step by step so I can still work it out.
    For example: Instead of you saying the diameter is 12.73 you say ...next you need to work out the diameter by doing the circumference/pi. not 40/pi=12.73.

    Thanks

    (That drawing is very rough, So it is definantly not to scale)


    Edit:
    Just noticed you don't help with things counting towards final grades so I thought I should point out that this is just a piece of homework. Doesn't count for anything, our reports have already been done.
    Last edited by Metalingus; May 3rd 2010 at 09:56 AM. Reason: Needed to add detail.
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  2. #2
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    shaded area = area of the sector - area of the triangle

    area of a sector = \frac{r^2 \theta}{2} , where \theta = measure of the central angle in radians

    you mentioned nothing about the triangle ... is it isosceles, a right triangle ... what ???
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metalingus View Post

    I'm stuck on this question, trigonometry is the only thing in math that I really don't get.

    Some information for you:
    The angle in the triangle is 15 degrees if that's not clear.
    I need to find the area of the space between the edge of the triangle and the circle.
    That triangle is meant to start from the middle of the circle.
    I know that there is 24 of the triangles in the circle.

    Circumference of the circle is 40cm
    Diameter is 12.73(2 decimal places)
    Radius is 6.34

    I would like to know how to solve this, what the steps are so you don't just say i did this got this and then bam! Theres your answer.
    I want the whole lot, but step by step so I can still work it out.
    For example: Instead of you saying the diameter is 12.73 you say ...next you need to work out the diameter by doing the circumference/pi. not 40/pi=12.73.

    Thanks

    (That drawing is very rough, So it is definantly not to scale)


    Edit:
    Just noticed you don't help with things counting towards final grades so I thought I should point out that this is just a piece of homework. Doesn't count for anything, our reports have already been done.
    Are 2 vertices of the triangle meant to be on the circumference of the circle?
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