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Math Help - Forces, 90% Trig

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Oct 2009
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    Forces, 90% Trig

    Forces P, Q and R act on a particle at O in the plane of the coordinate axes 0x, 0y. Force P acts along 0x, Q acts along 0y, and R acts at an angle theta with 0x, in the first quadrant. Calculate the magnitude of the resultant force and the angle it makes with 0x when:

    P=3N
    Q=4N
    R=5N
    theta= 60 degrees

    I worked out the resultant force by resolving 'R' into horizontal and vertical forces, but you cant work out the angle it makes with 0x by doing this. I was hoping someone with more trig knowledge could help out.
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  2. #2
    Member
    Joined
    Dec 2009
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    Just curious

    Or the angle was 60^0?
    My mistake sorry, why cant you work out the angle?
    I never seen notations like 0x 0y? does that mean..0x = along the x-axis?

    If you worked out the resulting force just draw a picture.
    Use the tip to tail method with the vector and you should be able to calculate the angle. You will have to sides and a right angle triangel.
    Assuming you have a vector along the x-axis and one along the y-axis + your vector R (split inte x;y its components).
    I got a bit confused by the notations you are using 0x;0y sorry if I missread the question..?Did I?
    Hope it helped otherwise
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