Results 1 to 4 of 4

Math Help - Interesting Math Problem

  1. #1
    Newbie
    Joined
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    15

    Interesting Math Problem

    Okay the game is texas holdem, you have 1 card to come. The math below allows us to calculate the percentage of your card turning pretty accurately, max varince of 1.5%.

    Very little brain usage required, essential in my case!

    12+ Outs: (Outs X 2) + 2 = % of hitting
    3-11 Outs: (Outs x 2) + 1 = % of hitting
    1-3 Outs: Outs x 2 = % of hitting

    Outs / Actual Percentage / Our easy to calculate %

    20 43.50% 42%
    19 41.30% 40%
    18 39.10% 38%
    17 37.00% 36%
    16 34.80% 34%
    15 32.60% 32%
    14 30.40% 30%
    13 28.30% 28%
    12 26.10% 26%
    11 23.90% 23%
    10 21.70% 21%
    9 19.60% 19%
    8 17.40% 17%
    7 15.20% 15%
    6 13.00% 13%
    5 10.90% 11%
    4 8.70% 9%
    3 6.50% 6%
    2 4.30% 4%
    1 2.20% 2%

    Example we have 5 outs, so we times 5 by 2 to get 10 and +1 for an 11% chance of hitting 1 of our cards. actual 10.90%.

    Alot of poker players will just work to a rule of x2 but doing it like this gives us a little edge and edges are good in poker! The problem I am having is finding a similar soultion for the following percentages (2 cards to come)..... So just wondering if any great math brains can help me find something similar to the above but practical to use.

    20 67.5%
    19 65.0%
    18 62.4%
    17 59.8%
    16 57.0%
    15 54.1%
    14 51.2%
    13 48.1%
    12 45.0%
    11 41.7%
    10 38.4%
    9 35.0%
    8 31.5%
    7 27.8%
    6 24.1%
    5 20.3%
    4 16.5%
    3 12.5%
    2 8.4%
    1 4.3%

    again x4 seems to be the best for outs 1 - 8, 36% is acceptable for 9 outs but its from 10 onwards that i cant find any "simple" consistency that i could use in a simlar manner.

    Thanks
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    Newbie
    Joined
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    10
    20 67.5% 69%
    19 65.0% 66%
    18 62.4% 63%
    17 59.8% 60%
    16 57.0% 57%
    15 54.1% 54%
    14 51.2% 51%
    13 48.1% 48%
    12 45.0% 45%
    11 41.7% 42%
    10 38.4% 39%
    9 35.0% 36%
    8 31.5% 32%
    7 27.8% 28%
    6 24.1% 24%
    5 20.3% 20%
    4 16.5% 16%
    3 12.5% 12%
    2 8.4% 8%
    1 4.3% 4%


    x4 works up to 8, but then it looks like you need to subtract on a sliding scale: 3x+9. I started with a more complicated formula, but this is how it worked out. It's pretty close for 9 on.

    would give you % in green. You could change again at 19, but if you have 19 outs, what are you complaining about???
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    Newbie
    Joined
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    15
    Exceptional response!

    Love this forum already just wish the poker traffic was slightly higher.

    After doing some more reading found out about "Solomans Law", harrington on cash, advocates ((outs x 4)-(outs-8)). Again only worth doing for when we have 9+ outs.

    Think I find your way easier, both seem very accurate for quick live table calculations.

    Thanks very much, hope to discuss more holdem math poker topics with you in the future
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    Newbie
    Joined
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by LovePokerHateMath View Post
    After doing some more reading found out about "Solomans Law", harrington on cash, advocates ((outs x 4)-(outs-8)). Again only worth doing for when we have 9+ outs.
    I actually started with something close to that when I did it the first time:

    4x-(x-9)

    I had a nine instead of an eight. But then we can simplify by distributing the negative:

    4x-x+9

    And finally:

    3x+9

    Where x is the number of outs. It's the same formula as Solomon's, only written in a different way.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: June 9th 2011, 12:45 PM
  2. Interesting Problem, Please Help
    Posted in the Math Puzzles Forum
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: August 5th 2010, 04:27 AM
  3. Replies: 4
    Last Post: January 13th 2010, 07:42 AM
  4. Interesting Problem
    Posted in the Statistics Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: May 15th 2009, 10:10 AM
  5. Interesting Problem
    Posted in the Pre-Calculus Forum
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: July 16th 2006, 07:29 AM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum