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Thread: Statistics Problem: Counting.

  1. #1
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    Statistics Problem: Counting.

    A clinical test on humans of a new drug is normally done in three phases.Phase I is conducted with a relatively small number of healthy volunteers.For example, Phase I of bexarotene involved only 14 subjects.Assume that we want to treat 14 healthy humans with this new drug, and we have 16 suitable volunteers available.

    a) if the subjects are selected and treated in sequence, so that the trial is discontinued if anyone displays adverse effects, how many different sequential arrangements are possible if 14 people are selected from the 16 that are available?

    For a), do I just do 16 C 14 on my calculator as order does not matter, they want as much possible arrangements right? IF so, it is a big number.

    b) If 14 subjects are selected from the 16 that are available, and the 14 selected subject are treated at the same time, how many different treatment groups are possible.

    Would this just be 14! ?

    c) If 14 subjects are randomly selected and treated at the same time, what is the probability of selecting the 14 youngest subjects?

    Wouldn't this be just P(14/16)?
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    Re: Statistics Problem: Counting.

    Edit I found out for 1: it is 16 Permuations 14, and 16 Combinations 14.

    I cannot find c) still.
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    Re: Statistics Problem: Counting.

    Quote Originally Posted by math951 View Post
    Edit I found out for 1: it is 16 Permuations 14, and 16 Combinations 14.

    I cannot find c) still.
    1st of all, the answer to part c is a real number between 0 and 1. What does p(14/16) even mean.
    How many ways can you pick 14 people from 16 (and no, it is NOT a large number). Of those, how many have the youngest 14?
    Last edited by JaguarXJS; Dec 15th 2016 at 08:29 PM.
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    Re: Statistics Problem: Counting.

    I just didn't study this subject. It is my fault I do not understand basic concepts in stats. Moreover, my professor got fired 3/4th into the semester, so for the last 2 weeks we re-learned everything and crammed 8 chapters into 2 4-hour classdays.
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