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Math Help - Question: Contribution to a total %

  1. #1
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    Question: Contribution to a total %

    Hi all. I apologize in advance for any 'fuzzy' math terms I use in my post below. I am a big proponent of being as specific as possible when asking for help, but in this case, I not sure exactly what it is I'm asking. English was my major, not math. If one is so inclined, I would appreciate not only assistance with figuring out the answer to my question, but also the correct terminology of what I'm trying to ask! Feel free to improve on my numbers and offer any suggestions as to additional ways I could parse this data.

    I have 311 units (people in this case). Each unit thus contributes 0.3215% toward the total.
    I now have 966 (insert fuzzy phrase here) - things that I'm measuring. In this case, it's actually total sick days for the year.
    So, each person has, on average, 3.106 sick days for the year (we are, as of today, 243 days into the year).
    Further, 3.975 people call in sick per day.
    Now, we have one employee who (literally) has 52 sick days for the year. Without this one employee, the average per person drop from 3.106 days to 2.939 days.
    52 days divided by 966 days = 5.383%. So this one person is contributing toward 5.383% of all sick days.

    Ok, so far so good.

    What I'm trying to do (and I have no clue what this type of number might be called) is to say that each person contributes 0.3215% towards 100%. The total 'contribution' of our 52 day sick employee is 5.383%. How can I say that 0.3215% is contributing 5.383% in a mathematically correct way? My fumbling solution is to divide 5.838% by .3215%, which gives me 16.74. Is it fair to say something like "This employee is contributing 16.74 times their magnitude toward the total"?

    This is largely an intellectual exercise for me. I enjoy databases and working with Excel, but I recognize that my lack of understanding the fundamentals of mathematics is ... sad. And something I want to improve upon. So I figure why not take a real world example and see how many ways I can parse the data to get it to say different things!

    Out of interest, I've also figured out that if you extrapolate out the numbers to a full year (366 days this year!), then that will be 1455 total sick days, which would be an average of 4.68 sick days per person for the year. The person in question would end up with 78.3 sick days (I think!) if, you know, they continued at that pace without further action being taken.

    Anyway, thanks in advance for your time and for any assistance you can provide.
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  2. #2
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    london
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    Re: Question: Contribution to a total %

    311 people is the population
    966 sick days will be called a line of inquiry
    0.3215 in comparison to 5.383 can simply be said through comparison of population vs sick day contribution.....there is no fancy words to use, and it might even confuse people if it got too technical anyway. something like "the average amount of sick days per person is ........, and joe bloggs has had 16 times more than the average"
    As for whether it is fair...that's a moral judgement down to you whether you want to make an example of someone or not!

    One thing i do know, its a lot of sick days for 1 person!! I wouldn't want them employed, but then maybe it requires treading carefully if they have good ground..

    Enjoy
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