Results 1 to 8 of 8

Math Help - Binomial Distribution Problem

  1. #1
    No one in Particular VonNemo19's Avatar
    Joined
    Apr 2009
    From
    Detroit, MI
    Posts
    1,823

    Binomial Distribution Problem

    Use the binomial formula to calculate the probability that a given baseball team will win more than one game out of a total of ten. Show the appropriate formula.

    Hey guys, I forgot what I'm supposed to do here.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    MHF Contributor

    Joined
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    18,607
    Thanks
    1574
    Awards
    1
    If p is the probability of the team winning any given game then the probability of that team winning more than one game in ten is:
    1-(1-p)^{10}-10p(1-p)^9.

    Now can you explain why?
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    No one in Particular VonNemo19's Avatar
    Joined
    Apr 2009
    From
    Detroit, MI
    Posts
    1,823
    No, I can't because I hate probability. I'm a math tutor at a college and a student has this question and we're short staffed, and AAAAAaaargh.

    But, long story short, no. But I would like to know why.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    MHF Contributor

    Joined
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    18,607
    Thanks
    1574
    Awards
    1
    That is the opposite of winning none or exactly one.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  5. #5
    No one in Particular VonNemo19's Avatar
    Joined
    Apr 2009
    From
    Detroit, MI
    Posts
    1,823
    You're awesome Plato. So, (1-p)^{10}+10p(1-p)^9 represents what quantity again?
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  6. #6
    Bar0n janvdl's Avatar
    Joined
    Apr 2007
    From
    South Africa
    Posts
    1,630
    Thanks
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by VonNemo19 View Post
    You're awesome Plato. So, (1-p)^{10}+10p(1-p)^9 represents what quantity again?
    Won't that be the probability of them winning one or no games? Or in other words, losing 10 or 9 games.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  7. #7
    Super Member

    Joined
    May 2006
    From
    Lexington, MA (USA)
    Posts
    11,706
    Thanks
    625
    Hello, janvdl!

    Plato is absolutely correct!


    Won't that be the probability of them winning one or no games?
    Or in other words, losing 10 or 9 games? . Yes!

    Read the question again: "... more than one game ..."

    This means: .2, 3, 4, ... or 10 wins.

    The opposite is indeed: .0 or 1 win.

    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  8. #8
    Master Of Puppets
    pickslides's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 2008
    From
    Melbourne
    Posts
    5,236
    Thanks
    28
    P(X=2)+P(X=3)+P(X=4)+\dots +P(X=10) = 1 - (P(X=0)+P(X=1))
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Binomial Distribution Problem
    Posted in the Advanced Statistics Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: July 10th 2010, 07:47 PM
  2. binomial distribution problem
    Posted in the Statistics Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: April 2nd 2010, 10:09 AM
  3. Binomial Distribution Problem
    Posted in the Statistics Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: February 24th 2010, 08:17 PM
  4. Binomial Distribution Problem
    Posted in the Advanced Statistics Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: November 24th 2009, 08:19 PM
  5. Replies: 2
    Last Post: October 27th 2009, 06:47 PM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum