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Math Help - Binomial Distribution help?

  1. #1
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    Smile Binomial Distribution help?

    I have to do a worksheet for my AP stats class and I was wondering if anyone could help me get started on the first question. I do not want an answer, just help please =)

    Promt: For previous records on Mudlark Airlines, about 15% of people who had tickets for the flight did not take the light. There are 120 seats on the plane. (it also discusses overbooking in the previous paragraph)

    Question: how many tickets should mudlark Airlines sell for this flight?
    ~I know that n=20 and p=.15
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  2. #2
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    I don't really understand the question. From my point of view I would simply say, if 15% of people don't show up, then they should overbook by 15% - but that isn't a "stats" question, that just math. Perhaps if you typed out the COMPLETE prompt we could be of assistance.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by HippieChic View Post
    I have to do a worksheet for my AP stats class and I was wondering if anyone could help me get started on the first question. I do not want an answer, just help please =)

    Promt: For previous records on Mudlark Airlines, about 15% of people who had tickets for the flight did not take the light. There are 120 seats on the plane. (it also discusses overbooking in the previous paragraph)

    Question: how many tickets should mudlark Airlines sell for this flight?
    ~I know that n=20 and p=.15
    Let X be the random variable 'number of people who turn up'.

    X ~ Binomial(n = ?, p = 0.85).

    Find the largest value of n such that \Pr(X \leq 120) \geq q.

    The value of q is what's missing in your question. It's the probability that you aren't overbooked eg. q = 0.95. Until that value is known, nothing more can be done.
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