Results 1 to 4 of 4

Math Help - How do I determine independence?

  1. #1
    Newbie
    Joined
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    2

    How do I determine independence?

    I get really confused on how to decide whether or not 2 events are independent. I can do the homework as long as I understand how to set it up, but that's where I get confused. How do I know whether or not an event is independent?
    Last edited by mr fantastic; October 26th 2009 at 04:39 AM.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    Behold, the power of SARDINES!
    TheEmptySet's Avatar
    Joined
    Feb 2008
    From
    Yuma, AZ, USA
    Posts
    3,764
    Thanks
    78
    Quote Originally Posted by thepianoman View Post
    I get really confused on how to decide whether or not 2 events are independent. I can do the homework as long as I understand how to set it up, but that's where I get confused. How do I know whether or not an event is independent? Also, please help with my recent post "probability problems"...
    Two events A and B are independant if

    P(A \cap B)=P(A)P(B)
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    Newbie
    Joined
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    4
    What if you do not have the intersect is there any other way of telling?

    Quote Originally Posted by TheEmptySet View Post
    Two events A and B are independant if

    P(A \cap B)=P(A)P(B)
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    Super Member
    Joined
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    593
    Thanks
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by hiyarearl View Post
    What if you do not have the intersect is there any other way of telling?
    Generally a problem will tell you whether or not two events are independent, or you have to ascertain, from the description of the experiment whether or not an event is independent.

    For example, if the experiment was determining the probability of getting a heads on a first flip of a coin, and a tails on the second flip of a coin - the two flips themselves are independent, as the probability of the first flips outcome does not affect the probability of the second flips outcome.

    However, if somehow, say by magic, there was a way that the results of the first flip altered the probability of the second flip, then the second flip would be dependent on the first flip. Thats a cheesy example, but you get the idea. Generally, you should be able to look at the experiment that is being described and determine whether or not independence is occurring here or not.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: November 15th 2010, 01:24 PM
  2. independence
    Posted in the Statistics Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: September 21st 2010, 09:11 PM
  3. independence
    Posted in the Advanced Statistics Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: April 22nd 2010, 10:28 PM
  4. independence
    Posted in the Advanced Statistics Forum
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: January 27th 2010, 10:29 PM
  5. Replies: 1
    Last Post: April 22nd 2009, 03:05 AM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum