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Math Help - Probabilities

  1. #1
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    Probabilities

    If two balls are drawn (without replacement) from an urn that contains four red balls, five green balls and seven white balls. Find the probability that both balls are white.

    Possible solutions:
    2/3
    1/9
    7/40
    49/240
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  2. #2
    Grand Panjandrum
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    Quote Originally Posted by gretchen View Post
    If two balls are drawn (without replacement) from an urn that contains four red balls, five green balls and seven white balls. Find the probability that both balls are white.

    Possible solutions:
    2/3
    1/9
    7/40
    49/240
    Probability that first ball is white=#of white balls/total # of balls=7/16

    Probability that the second ball is white given that the first is white=
    #of white balls remaining/total # of balls remaining=6/15.

    Then the required prob. is the product of these=(7/16)(6/15)=7/40

    RonL
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  3. #3
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    Thanks for all your help Ron. What do you do for a living?

    Gretch
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by gretchen View Post
    Thanks for all your help Ron. What do you do for a living?
    Algorithm design consultant

    RonL
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  5. #5
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    Hello, Gretchen!

    If you familiar with "combinations", here's another approach . . .


    If two balls are drawn (without replacement) from an urn that contains:
    4 red balls, 5 green balls and 7 white balls, find the probability that both balls are white.

    Possible solutions: . \frac{2}{3}\quad\frac{1}{9}\quad\frac{7}{40}\quad\  frac{49}{240}
    There are 16 balls.

    There are \binom{16}{2}\,=\,120 possible pairs of balls.

    There are \binom{7}{2}\,=\,21 possible pairs of white balls.

    Therefore: . P(\text{both white})\:=\:\frac{21}{120} \:=\:\frac{7}{40}

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