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Math Help - Oscilloscope problem

  1. #1
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    Oscilloscope problem

    Please can anyone help me with this problem.

    Question is what is formula for X and Y if this is picture on oscilloscope?

    Thanks!
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by miro View Post
    Please can anyone help me with this problem.

    Question is what is formula for X and Y if this is picture on oscilloscope?

    Thanks!
    It appears to be an ellipse centred at the origin, so its equation will be of the form ax^2+bxy+cy^2=1, where a, b and c are constants whose values will depend on the dimensions and orientation of the ellipse.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by miro View Post
    Please can anyone help me with this problem.

    Question is what is formula for X and Y if this is picture on oscilloscope?

    Thanks!
    x=5 \sin(\omega t)

    y=4 \sin(\omega t + \phi)

    The relative phase difference \phi will determine the orientation of the ellipse, and from the display you cannot determine the frequency \omega

    CB
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  4. #4
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    Thanks! CaptainBlack , can you tell me how did you get this. My only clue how to read this picture is that arcsin(a/b) is phase angle between x and y.
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  5. #5
    Grand Panjandrum
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    Quote Originally Posted by miro View Post
    Thanks! CaptainBlack , can you tell me how did you get this. My only clue how to read this picture is that arcsin(a/b) is phase angle between x and y.
    Its the Lissajous figure you get when you apply a sin wave to the x input and another sine wave (different amplitude and phase but same frequency) to the y input. The amplitude of the x-wave is the maximum x value that the figure achives, and of the y-wave is the maximum y value.

    CB
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