Results 1 to 6 of 6

Math Help - Remainder Theorem

  1. #1
    Newbie
    Joined
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    20

    Remainder Theorem

    Find the remainder when x^3 + 4x^2 - 7x + 6 is divided by x - 3, by using the remainder theorem, and by long division.
    Last edited by Coolman; July 19th 2009 at 01:10 PM.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    Newbie
    Joined
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    20
    P(3) = x^3 + 4x^2 - 7x + 6
    P(3) = (3)^3 + 4(3)^2 – 7(3) + 6
    P(3) = 27 + 36 – 21 + 6
    P(3) = 48

    Therefore, the remainder of x^3 + 4x^2 - 7x + 6 divided by x – 3 is 48
    This is what I got, is it right? (My first time doing the Remainder Theorem)
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    -1
    e^(i*pi)'s Avatar
    Joined
    Feb 2009
    From
    West Midlands, England
    Posts
    3,053
    Thanks
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Coolman View Post
    This is what I got, is it right? (My first time doing the Remainder Theorem)
    I believe you're correct - you're working looks fine and checking via long division arrives at the same remainder
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    Newbie
    Joined
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by e^(i*pi) View Post
    I believe you're correct - you're working looks fine and checking via long division arrives at the same remainder
    How did you do it via long division? I'm trying and I am not getting the same answer.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  5. #5
    -1
    e^(i*pi)'s Avatar
    Joined
    Feb 2009
    From
    West Midlands, England
    Posts
    3,053
    Thanks
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Coolman View Post
    How did you do it via long division? I'm trying and I am not getting the same answer.
    Since my latex sucks when it comes to more than the basics I will scan it in.

    Edit 1: the main idea is to divide each term by x initially and then multiply this answer back with the x and the -3. Write that underneath the existing part and then subtract before moving along each power of x until you reach the constant term and that number is the remainder
    Last edited by e^(i*pi); July 19th 2009 at 02:44 PM.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  6. #6
    Newbie
    Joined
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by e^(i*pi) View Post
    Since my latex sucks when it comes to more than the basics I will scan it in.

    Edit 1: the main idea is to divide each term by x initially and then multiply this answer back with the x and the -3. Write that underneath the existing part and then subtract before moving along each power of x until you reach the constant term and that number is the remainder
    Ohhhh, I forgot the three was negative. Thanks!
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. remainder theorem
    Posted in the Algebra Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: October 9th 2010, 02:29 AM
  2. remainder theorem
    Posted in the Algebra Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: September 17th 2009, 06:26 AM
  3. Remainder Theorem
    Posted in the Algebra Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: July 26th 2009, 09:05 PM
  4. remainder theorem
    Posted in the Algebra Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: March 9th 2009, 02:16 PM
  5. Factor Theorem and Remainder Theorem
    Posted in the Algebra Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: September 8th 2007, 11:50 AM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum