Results 1 to 6 of 6

Math Help - Average Rate of Change

  1. #1
    MHF Contributor
    Joined
    Jul 2008
    From
    NYC
    Posts
    1,489

    Average Rate of Change

    Find the average rate of change for the given function in the following interval.

    F(x) = sinx + 2 [-90 degrees, 90 degrees]

    My answer is 1.

    Is this right or wrong?

    If wrong, why?

    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    Moo
    Moo is offline
    A Cute Angle Moo's Avatar
    Joined
    Mar 2008
    From
    P(I'm here)=1/3, P(I'm there)=t+1/3
    Posts
    5,618
    Thanks
    6
    Hello,

    If I understand correctly what an averate rate of change is, I'd say it's :

    \frac{F(90)-F(-90)}{90-(-90)}=\dots=\frac{3-1}{180}=\dots
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    Newbie
    Joined
    Dec 2008
    From
    Beijing, China
    Posts
    17
    I think the answer is 2 if you are getting the average of the function and it is zero if you are getting the average of its derivative(rate).
    The averaging of a function involves the integration of the function between the limits given divided by the interval. Of course you sould substitute the limits in radians.
    This is purely mathematical.
    if you graph this function you will find it a sine wave shifted upwards two units. so the average is two without computing.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    Super Member
    Joined
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    792
    The average rate of change, in this case, is the slope of the line containing the endpoints of the interval.

    The instantaneous rate of change is the derivative, or the slope of the line tangent to a certain point.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  5. #5
    Flow Master
    mr fantastic's Avatar
    Joined
    Dec 2007
    From
    Zeitgeist
    Posts
    16,948
    Thanks
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by samer_guirguis_2000 View Post
    I think the answer is 2 if you are getting the average of the function and

    it is zero if you are getting the average of its derivative(rate). Mr F says: No. The average of the derivative is NOT zero.

    The averaging of a function involves the integration of the function between the limits given divided by the interval. Of course you sould substitute the limits in radians.
    This is purely mathematical.
    if you graph this function you will find it a sine wave shifted upwards two units. so the average is two without computing.
    The question asks for the average rate of change. The correct answer has already been given by moo.

    Discussion on the average of the function and average of the derivative is not helpful to the OP at the present time.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  6. #6
    MHF Contributor
    Joined
    Jul 2008
    From
    NYC
    Posts
    1,489

    Thanks

    I want to thank all who took time out to explain this question.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Average rate of change!
    Posted in the Pre-Calculus Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: January 27th 2010, 07:32 PM
  2. Average Rate of Change
    Posted in the Pre-Calculus Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: October 28th 2009, 01:54 PM
  3. average rate of change
    Posted in the Pre-Calculus Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: September 27th 2009, 09:22 AM
  4. Average Rate of Change
    Posted in the Pre-Calculus Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: October 27th 2008, 08:39 PM
  5. average rate of change
    Posted in the Pre-Calculus Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: August 16th 2008, 09:55 AM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum