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Math Help - Amebas Experiment

  1. #1
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    Amebas Experiment

    The scientists in a laboratory company raise amebas to sell to schoolsfor use in biology classes. They know that one ameba divides into twoamebas every hour and that the formula t = log_2 N can be used to determine how long in hours, t, it takes to produce a certain number
    of amebas, N. Determine, to the nearest tenth of an hour, how long it takes to produce 10,000 amebas if they start with one ameba.
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  2. #2
    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by magentarita View Post
    The scientists in a laboratory company raise amebas to sell to schoolsfor use in biology classes. They know that one ameba divides into twoamebas every hour and that the formula t = log_2 N can be used to determine how long in hours, t, it takes to produce a certain number
    of amebas, N. Determine, to the nearest tenth of an hour, how long it takes to produce 10,000 amebas if they start with one ameba.
    you want t = \log_2 10000
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  3. #3
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    Can you...

    Quote Originally Posted by Jhevon View Post
    you want t = \log_2 10000
    Can you explain a bit more?
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    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by magentarita View Post
    Can you explain a bit more?
    they told us that the amoeba divide according to t = \log_2 N, where t is the number of hours since they began and N is the number of amoebas. if we want to know the time when we have 10000 amoebas, we just plug in N = 10000 and solve for
    t
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  5. #5
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    ok

    Quote Originally Posted by Jhevon View Post
    they told us that the amoeba divide according to t = \log_2 N, where t is the number of hours since they began and N is the number of amoebas. if we want to know the time when we have 10000 amoebas, we just plug in N = 10000 and solve for
    t

    Ok...much better.
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