Results 1 to 6 of 6

Math Help - The point of no return

  1. #1
    Newbie
    Joined
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    10

    Exclamation The point of no return



    I have absolutely no idea about this. Can you give me a step by step solution?
    Thanks for your attention, appreciate it.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    Flow Master
    mr fantastic's Avatar
    Joined
    Dec 2007
    From
    Zeitgeist
    Posts
    16,948
    Thanks
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by hungrybarts View Post


    I have absolutely no idea about this. Can you give me a step by step solution? Mr F says: You want to be given a step-by-step solution to an assessment task Do the words academic fraud mean anything to you? I will give you some help with question 1 (see main post) - then you're on your own.
    Thanks for your attention, appreciate it.
    Let d be distance from the air field and t be time flying.

    On an appropriate set of axes, draw the line d = 350 t (where has the 350 come from?) but stop at a point. Label that point (d1, t1). t1 is the time flown with the wind. What is the relationship between d1 and t1 (you will need this relationship)?

    Now draw a line from the point (d1, t1) to the point (0, 4) (where has the 4 come from?) What must the slope of this line be? Use the value of this slope to help calculate a value of t1.

    Hence answer question 2.
    Last edited by mr fantastic; August 9th 2008 at 07:31 PM.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    Newbie
    Joined
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    10
    my apologize for that mr fantastic but apparently, no one in my class is able to solve this so, should the distance be on the y-axis and the time be on the x-axis (distance against time)? and i still don't get how to do no 1
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    Flow Master
    mr fantastic's Avatar
    Joined
    Dec 2007
    From
    Zeitgeist
    Posts
    16,948
    Thanks
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by hungrybarts View Post
    my apologize for that mr fantastic but apparently, no one in my class is able to solve this so, should the distance be on the y-axis and the time be on the x-axis (distance against time)? Mr F says: Yes.

    and i still don't get how to do no 1 Mr F says: Now try doing what I suggested in my first post.
    ..
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Joined
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    65
    Hello,
    I believe I can answer the question. However, as I understand a "hint" is given to help someone, but its usage is not imperative. I have so decided to disregard the graph hint and thought up another solution, whose correctness I cannot guarantee.

    My idea is the following:
    We are looking for a maximum distance which we can travel given the circumstances and come back.
    So let S1 be the distance we are travelling forward, V1 - the going-forward speed, t1 - the time we are travelling forward and S2, V2, t2 - the same variables only that when we are travelling back.

    So our aim is to make S1 = S2.
    The formula from the physics classes we know for a distance travelled is:
    S = V / t.
    So S1 = V1 / t1 and S2 = V2 / t2.
    We need S1 to be equal to S2, so
    V1 / t1 = V2 / t2.
    We know that t1+t2 = 4 and V1 and V2's values are known.
    From here onwards it is all simplification and eventually I get that the maximum time that can be travelled forward is 7/3 hours and 5/3 hours back.

    As I said I cannot guarantee that the solution is correct and I am open to any critics as long as they do not leave the borders of logic and clear thinking.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  6. #6
    Newbie
    Joined
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    10
    finally i figured this out here is my working



    i suppose it has covered 1-3

    now the last problem is 4
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. C++, Return void?
    Posted in the Math Software Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: June 19th 2010, 10:10 AM
  2. Annual Return
    Posted in the Algebra Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: July 12th 2009, 01:40 PM
  3. Expected Return
    Posted in the Statistics Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: June 7th 2009, 04:44 AM
  4. Point of No Return (Wrd P)
    Posted in the Algebra Forum
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: October 10th 2008, 10:38 AM
  5. Rate of Return
    Posted in the Business Math Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: February 17th 2007, 11:26 AM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum