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Thread: Graph of f(x-n)

  1. #1
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    Question Graph of f(x-n)

    This is kinda idiotic question:

    Why is graph of function let's say f(x-2) shifted to the right by 2, not to the left by 2?

    Because we subtract, so we should go to the left. I would like to see a mathematical proof. Thanks.
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  2. #2
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    Re: Graph of f(x-n)

    Quote Originally Posted by Nforce View Post
    This is kinda idiotic question:

    Why is graph of function let's say f(x-2) shifted to the right by 2, not to the left by 2?

    Because we subtract, so we should go to the left. I would like to see a mathematical proof. Thanks.
    horizontal transformations
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  3. #3
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    Re: Graph of f(x-n)

    When x= 3, f(x- 2)= f(3- 2)= f(1). The value f(1) has been moved from x= 1 to x= 3, two places to the right.
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  4. #4
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    Re: Graph of f(x-n)

    When we make the equation set to zero, i.e x-2=0, we notice that bringing the two over to the right side is equal to positive 2, hence why it is "transformed" to the right.
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