Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: Graphing composite functions

  1. #1
    Newbie
    Joined
    Jan 2017
    From
    Canada
    Posts
    6

    Graphing composite functions

    If the original graph y=g(x) has the following coordinates: (-1,0); (0,-1); (1,-2); (2,-3); (-2,1); (-3,2) then graph y= (1/g)(x). I don't quite understand how to do this one. Should I divide 1/y coordinates for g(x) to get the proper coordinates or is there a different way I should be doing this?
    Any clarification would be awesome. Thanks!
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    MHF Contributor
    Joined
    Nov 2013
    From
    California
    Posts
    5,122
    Thanks
    2175

    Re: Graphing composite functions

    Quote Originally Posted by thebestrose828 View Post
    If the original graph y=g(x) has the following coordinates: (-1,0); (0,-1); (1,-2); (2,-3); (-2,1); (-3,2) then graph y= (1/g)(x). I don't quite understand how to do this one. Should I divide 1/y coordinates for g(x) to get the proper coordinates or is there a different way I should be doing this?
    Any clarification would be awesome. Thanks!
    coordinates are in the form of $(x, g(x))$

    so to plot $(1/g)(x)$ just replace the second element of each coordinate pair with it's reciprocal and plot as usual.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Mar 30th 2012, 06:36 PM
  2. Composite functions?
    Posted in the Algebra Forum
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: Jul 11th 2011, 01:32 PM
  3. Composite Functions
    Posted in the Pre-Calculus Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Aug 22nd 2009, 07:25 PM
  4. Composite Functions
    Posted in the Pre-Calculus Forum
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: Nov 19th 2008, 11:33 AM
  5. Graphing Composite Functions
    Posted in the Pre-Calculus Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Sep 29th 2008, 01:57 PM

/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum