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Math Help - natural domains of the following functions

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    natural domains of the following functions



    i have substituted the values and i know the answer for the first one but i dont know the rest, also they have to be done using set and interval notation, i have a rough idea but not quite sure...

    so far i have...


    please help me out
    thanks
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    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by b00yeah05 View Post


    i have substituted the values and i know the answer for the first one but i dont know the rest, also they have to be done using set and interval notation, i have a rough idea but not quite sure...
    for (i), we want all the x's in the domain of p(x) for which p(x) \ne 0

    for (ii) we want all the x's in the domain of p(x) AND q(x) (at the same time) for which q(x) \ne 0

    for (iii) we want all the x's in the range of q(x) that are in the domain of r(x)

    for (iv) we want all the x's in the range of p(x) that are in the domain of s(x) and of course, we cannot have s(p(x)) = 0
    Last edited by Jhevon; January 13th 2008 at 10:32 PM.
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    sorry i didnt understand a single thing you just said, would you mind explaining or elaborating a bit more please?? except for the part that the denominator cant be zero..i understand that as the function will be undefined.

    thanks, and also for the question i posted earlier about continuity..i got k=29...so thats the value where it would be continuous..am i correct? please check

    thanks heaps
    Last edited by b00yeah05; January 13th 2008 at 10:31 PM. Reason: added explanation
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    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by b00yeah05 View Post
    sorry i didnt understand a single thing you just said, would you mind explaining or elaborating a bit more please?? except for the part that the denominator cant be zero..i understand that as the function will be undefined.
    so for (ii), we need to make sure that the x's we choose work in both p(x) and q(x) at the same time, that's all i'm saying. yes, we cannot choose x's that make q(x) zero, but we can't choose x's that are in the domain of q(x) but not in the domain of p(x) either, since the top function won't work and we can't get a value for the fraction

    for (iii). the range is the output values we can have. so for, say, q(x) the domain is the x's we can plug into q, while the output values q(x) are the range. for example. for the function y = x^2, the domain is all real x, because we can plug in anything we choose for x. however, the output values are "limited", no matter what we plug in, we will always get an output value greater than or equal to zero, so the range of y = x^2 is all y's such that y \ge 0 or in other words, y \in [0, \infty). a similar thing holds here.

    when we say r(q(x)), it means we are taking the outputs from the function q and plugging them into the function r. so first, we need to know what are the possible output values for q, and then we need to know, which of these values are in the domain of r. those are the values that are in the domain of r(q(x))

    a similar thing holds true for (iv)

    got it?


    thanks, and also for the question i posted earlier about continuity..i got k=29...so thats the value where it would be continuous..am i correct? please check
    please make this comment in the thread that you are refering to, so other users can follow
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    just wanting to check my answers now...:P

    (i) x can be all real numbers except 2/3 <-- how do i put that into set and interval notation??

    (ii) (-infinity, 2/3) U (2, infinity)

    (iii) (-infinity, -2) U (2, infinity)

    (iv)..no idea
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    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by b00yeah05 View Post
    just wanting to check my answers now...:P

    (i) x can be all real numbers except 2/3 <-- how do i put that into set and interval notation??
    (-\infty, 2/3) \cup (2/3, \infty)

    (ii) (-infinity, 2/3) U (2, infinity)
    incorrect. both p(x) and q(x) are polynomials, all x's work in them. thus our only concern here is that q(x) is not zero. what x's make that happen?

    (iii) (-infinity, -2) U (2, infinity)
    correct

    (iv)..no idea
    here we have to choose those x's that makes p(x)>1 (why is that?)

    so what's the answer?
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    yah i got the last one now..just to check (-infinity, -1/3) because if it is -1/3 then the function is undefined..also could you please give me the correct answer for p(x)/q(x)..im really tryin on that one but getting no where...
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    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by b00yeah05 View Post
    yah i got the last one now..just to check (-infinity, -1/3) because if it is -1/3 then the function is undefined..
    correct
    also could you please give me the correct answer for p(x)/q(x)..im really tryin on that one but getting no where...
    as i said, any x can work in both p(x) and q(x), so all we care about is that q(x) is non-zero. so we want

    q(x) = x^2 - 4 \ne 0

    \Rightarrow (x + 2)(x - 2) \ne 0

    \Rightarrow x \ne 2 \mbox{ and } x \ne -2

    so the domain is: (-\infty, -2) \cup (-2,2) \cup (2, \infty)
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    thank you very very much tonite jhevon. i have learnt so much tonight and feel like i know what im doing now....you have been very helpful thanking you again
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    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by b00yeah05 View Post
    thank you very very much tonite jhevon. i have learnt so much tonight and feel like i know what im doing now....you have been very helpful thanking you again
    you're welcome
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