Results 1 to 4 of 4

Math Help - Using the Binomial Theory to determine the approx. percentage change in the area?

  1. #1
    Newbie
    Joined
    Jan 2013
    From
    stafford
    Posts
    8

    Unhappy Using the Binomial Theory to determine the approx. percentage change in the area?

    Im so stuck on this! please help!!

    thank you
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Using the Binomial Theory to determine the approx. percentage change in the area?-screen-shot-2013-01-20-18.49.50.png  
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    MHF Contributor

    Joined
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    15,725
    Thanks
    1478

    Re: Using the Binomial Theory to determine the approx. percentage change in the area?

    You are "stuck" implies that you have started the problem but then ran into a problem. Okay, what have you done and exactly where did you hit the "problem"?
    If you have not done anything, perhaps the problem is with basic formulae or definitions. Do you know how to find the area of a circle? Do you know what the "binomial theorem" is?
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    Newbie
    Joined
    Jan 2013
    From
    stafford
    Posts
    8

    Re: Using the Binomial Theory to determine the approx. percentage change in the area?

    When i said stuck i meant im working on a college assignment and came to this question. the reason im stuck on it is because our teacher hasnt gone through this with us yet. ive tried google'ing binomial theorem and i cant find anything that relates to what i need to do. is there any possibility that you could show me step by step how id work this out??

    Thank you
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    Newbie
    Joined
    Jan 2013
    From
    stafford
    Posts
    8

    Re: Using the Binomial Theory to determine the approx. percentage change in the area?

    But yes i know how to work out the area of a circle.

    Quote Originally Posted by HallsofIvy View Post
    You are "stuck" implies that you have started the problem but then ran into a problem. Okay, what have you done and exactly where did you hit the "problem"?
    If you have not done anything, perhaps the problem is with basic formulae or definitions. Do you know how to find the area of a circle? Do you know what the "binomial theorem" is?
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Replies: 6
    Last Post: March 16th 2010, 04:12 PM
  2. Replies: 4
    Last Post: February 3rd 2010, 11:50 AM
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: February 21st 2009, 05:19 AM
  4. ahh help please (normal approx. to binomial distribution)
    Posted in the Advanced Statistics Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: November 26th 2008, 02:09 AM
  5. Proving binomial to approx normal by CLT
    Posted in the Advanced Statistics Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: November 16th 2008, 12:11 PM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum