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Math Help - SAT Math probability, too

  1. #1
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    SAT Math probability, too

    A jar contains 50 pieces of candy: 25 red, 25 green. Ari has taken 3 red and 4 green pieces. He takes an additional 13 pieces. What is the least number of additional pieces thatmust be red in order for Ari to have more red candies than green candies among all the pieces he has taken?
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  2. #2
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    Re: SAT Math probability, too

    Eight. If eight of the 13 are red, he will have eleven total red candies (when he adds the three he already had). The remaining additional candies (only five are left) would be green. These would combine with the four green that he already had, giving him nine total that were green.

    If he had picked seven red and six green, that would have left him with ten of each - thus not fulfilling the requirements. The eleven/nine answer meets the "least number" requirement.

    The 25 red/25 green part is a standard example of useless information designed to confound the reader.
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