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Math Help - Polar coordinates & systems of equations

  1. #1
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    Polar coordinates & systems of equations

    I'm studying for a subject matter exam in order to become a certified teacher in Texas. I need help with some of the sample questions. These are not the actual questions that will be on the test.

    It's not necessary to be extremely detailed. A quick step-by-step, or how to do it on the calculator, or a summary of what I'm looking for, is usually fine.

    Thanks!

    Hope I'm posting this in the right place. I'm pretty sure polar coordinates makes this pre-calculus.

    Please see the attachment!
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  2. #2
    Senior Member abhishekkgp's Avatar
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    Re: Polar coordinates & systems of equations

    Quote Originally Posted by jbwtucker View Post
    I'm studying for a subject matter exam in order to become a certified teacher in Texas. I need help with some of the sample questions. These are not the actual questions that will be on the test.

    It's not necessary to be extremely detailed. A quick step-by-step, or how to do it on the calculator, or a summary of what I'm looking for, is usually fine.

    Thanks!

    Hope I'm posting this in the right place. I'm pretty sure polar coordinates makes this pre-calculus.

    Please see the attachment!
    i don't see why we need to do this using polar coordinates. my solution is:
    1) equation of the line shown is y-x=2.
    2)equation of the circle shown is x^2+y^2=1.
    you just have to solve the two equations simultaneously. just substitute y=x+2 in the second equation and solve the quadratic.
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  3. #3
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    Re: Polar coordinates & systems of equations

    I see. You're right, I guess it just looked like polar coordinates.

    So...

    x^2 + (x+2)^2 = 1
    2x^2 + 4x + 4 = 1
    2x^2 + 4x + 3 = 0

    Quadratic equation gives x = -1 (i√2)/2.

    Which is the same as x = -1 [(√2)/2]i. One of which is C.

    Thank you!
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