Results 1 to 6 of 6
Like Tree2Thanks
  • 1 Post By Drexel28
  • 1 Post By Tonek

Math Help - Sum e^x for values x= 0 to x = 10?

  1. #1
    Newbie
    Joined
    Apr 2010
    From
    Nashville
    Posts
    13

    Sum e^x for values x= 0 to x = 10?

    Is there a way to solve this problem without calculating each value of x individually and then summing the total? I have a feeling there is, but I don't know how to start. Thank you.

    sum x=0->10 for the equation e^x.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    MHF Contributor Also sprach Zarathustra's Avatar
    Joined
    Dec 2009
    From
    Russia
    Posts
    1,506
    Thanks
    1
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    MHF Contributor Drexel28's Avatar
    Joined
    Nov 2009
    From
    Berkeley, California
    Posts
    4,563
    Thanks
    21
    Thanks from datanewb
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    MHF Contributor Also sprach Zarathustra's Avatar
    Joined
    Dec 2009
    From
    Russia
    Posts
    1,506
    Thanks
    1
    My second foolish mistake for today! (Set theory do me a headache...)
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  5. #5
    Newbie
    Joined
    Mar 2010
    From
    Netherlands
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    1

    Just multiply by e-1.

    There is a very simple trick that also works if you want to sum more terms and if you have another number than e. You multiply the sum by e-1. That gives you 22 terms, but all but two of them cancel, and you are left with e^11-1. This means the sum is (e^11-1)/(e-1).
    Thanks from datanewb
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  6. #6
    MHF Contributor
    Joined
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    3,120
    Thanks
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Tonek View Post
    There is a very simple trick that also works if you want to sum more terms and if you have another number than e. You multiply the sum by e-1. That gives you 22 terms, but all but two of them cancel, and you are left with e^11-1. This means the sum is (e^11-1)/(e-1).
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Predicting maximum values from minimum values
    Posted in the Statistics Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: October 4th 2011, 08:42 AM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: June 1st 2011, 02:47 AM
  3. Single values vs set of values in an equation
    Posted in the Advanced Algebra Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: August 21st 2010, 04:45 AM
  4. Replies: 2
    Last Post: January 28th 2010, 02:39 AM
  5. Replies: 1
    Last Post: May 24th 2009, 06:16 AM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum