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Math Help - problem in Calculus ( derivaives ) ( slope )

  1. #1
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    problem in Calculus ( derivaives ) ( slope )

    Hi all ..

    problem in Calculus ( derivaives ) ( slope )

    Hi all
    plese I want check my answer , I don't know how i solve this queation but i try

    thanks
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  2. #2
    MHF Contributor Unknown008's Avatar
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    i.

    The derivative of y = sin(x) is

    y' = cos(x)

    Then, using x = pi/4, what you you get?

    iv.

    Using the product rule,

    \dfrac{dR}{dM} = M^2\left(-\dfrac13\right) + \left(\dfrac{C}{2} - \dfrac{M}{3}\right)\cdot 2M

    And I don't get what you got.

    v. I think that the 'jerk' means in some way the derivative... then yes, it's good.
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  3. #3
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    Q2 )

    I use the product rule

    I got -1/3m^2 + 2m.c/2.2m.m/3
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  4. #4
    Senior Member Educated's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by r-soy View Post
    Q2 )
    I use the product rule
    I got -1/3m^2 + 2m.c/2.2m.m/3
    How did you get that?

    Unknown008 has already given you the correct answer. Maybe you should show us your working so we can identify where you went wrong. (Also remember to use brackets)

    To make question (iv) easier, expand the brackets!

    M^2 (\frac{C}{2} - \frac{M}{3}) = \dfrac{C \cdot M^2}{2} - \dfrac{M^3}{3}

    Now that the brackets are expanded, there is no need to use the product rule and you should be able to differentiate it with no problem.
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  5. #5
    Junior Member pirateboy's Avatar
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    haha a jerk is a derivative? i've not heard that one before.

    edit: apparently it is so...well wikipedia says it is.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerk_%28physics%29
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  6. #6
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    "Jerk" is a physics term. It is the third derivative of the position function: first derivative is velocity, second derivative is acceleration, third derivative is jerk. But, r-soy, you have the wrong sign. If s= 5cos(t), then s'= -5sin(t), s''= -5cos(t), and s'''= 5sin(t).

    Using the product rule on R= M^2(\frac{C}{2}- \frac{M}{3}), R'= 2M(\frac{C}{2}- \frac{M}{3})+ M^2(-\frac{1}{3}= MC- \frac{2M^2}{3}-\frac{M^2}{3}= MC- M^2. r-soy, you dropped the "3" in the denominator.
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  7. #7
    MHF Contributor Unknown008's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HallsofIvy View Post
    "Jerk" is a physics term. It is the third derivative of the position function: first derivative is velocity, second derivative is acceleration, third derivative is jerk.

    ...
    Ah, it's good to know . Thank you!
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