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Math Help - Point of Intersection

  1. #1
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    Point of Intersection

    Hi there,

    The formula's are:
    y = -\frac{4}{3}x + 12.33
    y= \frac{3}{4}x + 4

    I'm unsure about how I go about it? I can do simultaneous equations and stuff, but we haven't really covered it.

    Can anyone point me in the right direction? I'm think I need to move the x to the other side, but I'm not sure.

    Thanks in advance
    Last edited by watp; September 4th 2010 at 12:15 PM. Reason: Missed x out :)
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  2. #2
    Senior Member yeKciM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by watp View Post
    Hi there,

    The formula's are:
    y = -\frac{4}{3} + 12.33
    y= \frac{3}{4} + 4

    I'm unsure about how I go about it? I can do simultaneous equations and stuff, but we haven't really covered it.

    Can anyone point me in the right direction? I'm think I need to move the x to the other side, but I'm not sure.

    Thanks in advance
    are you sure that you type that correctly here

    (that's just two horizontal lines )
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeKciM View Post
    are you sure that you type that correctly here

    (that's just two horizontal lines )
    Ha, I missed the x out
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  4. #4
    Senior Member yeKciM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by watp View Post
    Hi there,

    The formula's are:
    y = -\frac{4}{3}x + 12.33
    y= \frac{3}{4}x + 4

    I'm unsure about how I go about it? I can do simultaneous equations and stuff, but we haven't really covered it.

    Can anyone point me in the right direction? I'm think I need to move the x to the other side, but I'm not sure.

    Thanks in advance
    \displaystyle y=- \frac {4x}{3}+12.33
     \displaystyle y= \frac {3x}{4}+4

    so let's say from second you express the x like :

     \displaystyle y= \frac {3x}{4}+4  \Rightarrow 4y=3x+16 \Rightarrow 3x=4y-16 \Rightarrow x= \frac {4y-16}{3}

    and put in first one ....

    \displaystyle y=- \frac {4x}{3}+12.33

    \displaystyle y=- \frac {4(\frac {4y-16}{3} )}{3}+12.33

    \displaystyle y=- \frac {\frac {16y-64}{3} }{3} +12.33

    so you solve for y.... and just get it back in to equation for x

     \displaystyle x = \frac {4y-16}{3}

    and you should get that for x=4 they intersect
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeKciM View Post
    \displaystyle y=- \frac {4x}{3}+12.33
     \displaystyle y= \frac {3x}{4}+4

    so let's say from second you express the x like :

     \displaystyle y= \frac {3x}{4}+4  \Rightarrow 4y=3x+16 \Rightarrow 3x=4y-16 \Rightarrow x= \frac {4y-16}{3}

    and put in first one ....

    \displaystyle y=- \frac {4x}{3}+12.33

    \displaystyle y=- \frac {4(\frac {4y-16}{3} )}{3}+12.33

    \displaystyle y=- \frac {\frac {16y-64}{3} }{3} +12.33

    so you solve for y.... and just get it back in to equation for x

     \displaystyle x = \frac {4y-16}{3}

    and you should get that for x=4 they intersect
    Thanks yeKciM, I'll give it a try
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