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Math Help - limit of functions in a fraction

  1. #1
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    Smile limit of functions in a fraction

    I have the following:

    lim n->infinity f(n)/g(n) = 0

    I'm trying to understand what that actually means. From what I understand it is that when n goes to infinity, f(n) over g(n) goes to 0.

    but why would one make the functions in a fraction?

    This is used in the context of computer science. If you need any more info to help me, please let me know.
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  2. #2
    Super Member craig's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbone2500 View Post
    I have the following:

    lim n->infinity f(n)/g(n) = 0

    I'm trying to understand what that actually means. From what I understand it is that when n goes to infinity, f(n) over g(n) goes to 0.

    but why would one make the functions in a fraction?

    This is used in the context of computer science. If you need any more info to help me, please let me know.
    The function could be used to describe anything, populations, amounts of water in the ocean, anything you can think of that changes during time.

    The two functions simply mean an equation like \frac{x^2-3x}{x-2}, with a different functions as the numerator and denominator.
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