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Math Help - The property f(x)=2^x

  1. #1
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    The property f(x)=2^x

    I have a question for a home assignment and I'm looking through my text and I can't find it.

    Explain how to use the property of f(x)=2^x to obtain the graph of g(x)=log_2_x

    Thank you so much for any help!
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  2. #2
    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chinnie15 View Post
    I have a question for a home assignment and I'm looking through my text and I can't find it.

    Explain how to use the property of f(x)=2^x to obtain the graph of g(x)=log_2_x

    Thank you so much for any help!
    i believe you're referring to the inverse function property. f(x) and g(x) here are inverses of each other. if given the graph of an invertible function, the graph of its inverse can be obtained by reflecting the graph of the original function over the line y = x
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  3. #3
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    Thank you! That helps a lot. I think I've got it now.
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