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Math Help - oblique asymtopes

  1. #1
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    oblique asymtopes

    do we need to show oblique asymptopes (an asymptope that is 45degree in angle) when sketching or can we completeley ignore it?

    e.g. (x^3 +1 )/(x^2) has an oblique asymptope, but is it fine to draw the general shape so that it looks like there is no oblique asymptope?

    p.s. im talking about extension 2 maths curve sketching
    Last edited by purebladeknight; November 27th 2009 at 10:23 PM.
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by purebladeknight View Post
    do we need to show oblique asymptopes (an asymptope that is 45degree in angle) when sketching or can we completeley ignore it?

    e.g. x^3 +1 /x^2 has an oblique asymptope, but is it fine to draw the general shape so that it looks like there is no oblique asymptope?

    p.s. im talking about extension 2 maths curve sketching
    Do you mean (x^3 + 1)/x^2 or x^3 + (1/x^2)? Please use brackets in future so that your equations are not ambiguous.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr fantastic View Post
    Do you mean (x^3 + 1)/x^2 or x^3 + (1/x^2)? Please use brackets in future so that your equations are not ambiguous.
    ok.
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  4. #4
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    Aren't you going to answer mr fantastic's question?

    Generally, if you want an accurate graph, no, it isn't alright to ignore properties of the graph!

    If your function is, in fact, (x^3+ 1)/x^2 then it is the same as x+ (1/x^2). 1/x^2 goes to 0 as x becomes large (either negative or positive) so the oblique asymptotes is y= x, the two ends being separated by the main graph.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by HallsofIvy View Post
    Aren't you going to answer mr fantastic's question?

    Generally, if you want an accurate graph, no, it isn't alright to ignore properties of the graph!

    If your function is, in fact, (x^3+ 1)/x^2 then it is the same as x+ (1/x^2). 1/x^2 goes to 0 as x becomes large (either negative or positive) so the oblique asymptotes is y= x, the two ends being separated by the main graph.
    thanks and yes i did answer mr.fantastic's Q by editing the original Q
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by purebladeknight View Post
    thanks and yes i did answer mr.fantastic's Q by editing the original Q
    It is better to actually post an answer to a question you're asked rather than editing the original question. As you can see, the edit is easily overlooked (I didn't see the edit either). Also, the edit won't show up as a reply - which means that when I check my User CP I won't see any need to go to that thread, nor will anyone else. The thread will therefore get buried under all the new threads.
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