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Math Help - A limit question that shouldn't be as hard as it seems to me

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    A limit question that shouldn't be as hard as it seems to me

    Please help me find the limit as x approaches 0
    ((sqrt[1+2x] - sqrt[1+3x]) / x+2x^2) where x is greater than 0

    I know/think the easiest thing would be to get rid of the fraction first, but can't for some reason. Thanks
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by gixxer998 View Post
    Please help me find the limit as x approaches 0
    ((sqrt[1+2x] - sqrt[1+3x]) / x+2x^2) where x is greater than 0

    I know/think the easiest thing would be to get rid of the fraction first, but can't for some reason. Thanks
    Multiply the numerator and denominator by \sqrt{1 + 2x} + \sqrt{1 + 3x}, simplify the numerator, cancel the factor common to numerator and denominator and then take the limit.
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