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Math Help - an example of a ploynomial which factors, but has no roots

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    an example of a ploynomial which factors, but has no roots

    Give an example of a polynomial f(x) with integer coefficient which factors (poly mod n) but which has no roots, i.e. for which there are no integers x such that f(x) ≡ 0 (mod n).

    I can't find it! Can U help me? Thank you very much!
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    Quote Originally Posted by beta12
    Give an example of a polynomial f(x) with integer coefficient which factors (poly mod n) but which has no roots, i.e. for which there are no integers x such that f(x) ≡ 0 (mod n).

    I can't find it! Can U help me? Thank you very much!
    (x^2+1)(x^2+1)\equiv 0(\mbox{mod }p)
    For thus values of p (prime) such that, the Legendre Symbol, (-1/p)=-1, i.e. that is, p=4k+3
    ---
    The reason why I used a prime is because \mathbb{Z}_p[x] forms an integral domain and thus if two polynomials a,b are such that ab=0 upon the evaluation homomorphism then a=0\mbox{ or }b=0 upon evaluation homomorphism.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThePerfectHacker
    (x^2+1)(x^2+1)\equiv 0(\mbox{mod }p)
    For thus values of p (prime) such that, the Legendre Symbol, (-1/p)=-1, i.e. that is, p=4k+3
    ---
    The reason why I used a prime is because \mathbb{Z}_p[x] forms an integral domain and thus if two polynomials a,b are such that ab=0 upon the evaluation homomorphism then a=0\mbox{ or }b=0 upon evaluation homomorphism.
    I get it now! Good explanation. Now if only I could give you a rep point...

    -Dan
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    Quote Originally Posted by topsquark
    Now if only I could give you a rep point...
    Easy, spread some negative around then you can give me a postive point
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    Hi perfecthacker,

    Thks for your reply. So far I have learnt up to polynomial congruence. I haven't learnt Legendre Symbol yet.

    I have tried but still can't confirm your example is a polynomial which factors, but has no roots with my current polynomial congruence knowledge.

    Could you please explain your example to me with the concept of polynomail congruence? Thank you very much.
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    Quote Originally Posted by beta12
    Hi perfecthacker,

    Thks for your reply. So far I have learnt up to polynomial congruence. I haven't learnt Legendre Symbol yet.

    I have tried but still can't confirm your example is a polynomial which factors, but has no roots with my current polynomial congruence knowledge.

    Could you please explain your example to me with the concept of polynomail congruence? Thank you very much.
    The Ploynomial,
    (x^2+1)(x^2+1) by definition is multiplied as,
    x^4+2x^2+1
    Thus, the polynomial,
    x^4+2x^2+1\equiv 0 (\mbox{mod }p)
    Is reducible (meaning it factors) but is has no zeros. Because, it is necessary and sufficient that,
    x^2+1\equiv 0(\mbox{mod }p)
    Equivalenty,
    x^2\equiv -1(\mbox{mod }p)
    Note, that we are claiming that there exists an x such that is congruent to -1 modulo p. That is the same thing as saying "-1 is a quadradic residue of p" (definition). It can be shown without the Legendre Symbol that all the primes such that have -1 as a quadradic residue are 4k+1. In order, such that -1 not be a quadradic resides we require that p have form 4k+3 (because primes cannot have 4k,4k+2).
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    Thank you very much . I got it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThePerfectHacker
    It can be shown without the Legendre Symbol that all the primes such that have -1 as a quadradic residue are 4k+1.
    Theorem:The congruence x^2+1\equiv 0(\mbox{mod } p) where p is an odd prime has a solution if and only if p=4k+1.

    Proof: Let a solve the congruence. Thus,
    a^2\equiv -1(\mbox{mod } p)
    Fermat's Little Theorem,
    1\equiv a^{p-1}\equiv (a^2)^{(p-1)/2}\equiv (-1)^{(p-1)/2}(\mbox{mod } p)
    If p=4k+3 then the fact,
    (-1)^{(p-1)/2}=1 would not hold.
    That explain the "only if" part of the theorem.

    Note that,
    (p-1)!=1\cdot 2\cdot ...\cdot \frac{p-1}{2}\cdot \frac{p+1}{2}\cdot ...\cdot (p-2)(p-1)
    Also note that,
    p-1\equiv -1
    p-2\equiv -2
    p-3\equiv -3
    ...
    \frac{p+1}{2}\equiv -\frac{p-1}{2}
    Thus, the factorial above can be expressed as,
    (p-1)!\equiv 1(-1)2(-2)3(-3)\cdot ... \cdot \frac{p-1}{2} \cdot \left( -\frac{p-1}{2} \right)
    Thus,
    (p-1)!\equiv (-1)^{(p-1)/2} \left( 1\cdot 2\cdot 3\cdot...\cdot \frac{p-1}{2} \right)^2
    Wilson's Theorem,
    -1\equiv (-1)^{(p-1)/2} \left[ \left( \frac{p-1}{2} \right)!\right]^2(\mbox{mod } p).
    If,
    p=4k+1
    Then we have,
    \left[ \left( \frac{p-1}{2} \right)! \right]^2\equiv -1(\mbox{mod } p)
    Which is a solution to the congruence.
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    hi perfecthacker,

    Why p-1 =-1?
    from your proof
    p-1 =-1
    p-2=-2
    :
    :
    etc. ?

    I don't get this point. Could you please explain to me. Thank you very much!
    Last edited by beta12; September 9th 2006 at 02:18 PM. Reason: better outcome
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    Quote Originally Posted by beta12 View Post
    hi perfecthacker,
    Hello

    Quote Originally Posted by beta12
    Why p-1 =-1?
    It is not equal, it is congruent to. But I did not place the modulo sign because I assumed you understood I was working modulo 'p'.

    Quote Originally Posted by beta12
    from your proof
    Not my proof.

    Quote Originally Posted by beta12
    p-1 =-1
    p-2=-2
    :
    :
    etc. ?
    What you end with is a system of congrunces. You multiply then out using the theorem that you can multiplly congruecnes under the same modulo.
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    Hi perfecthacker,

    Thank you very much. I got it now.
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