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Thread: Prime Numbers

  1. #1
    CJW
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    Lightbulb Prime Numbers

    I've been dealing with Prime Numbers and I've concluded that there are only 42 Prime numbers.
    The numbers 2 and 3 are SUB-PRIMES, the Prime 5 and 7 can not appear again after 5/7.
    The 42 Primes are
    11 13 17 19 23 29 31 37 41 43 47 53 59 61 67 71 73 79 83 89 97 101 103 107 109 113 127 131 137 139 149 151 157 163 167 173 179 181 191 193 197 199.
    All other Primes are merely 210N times any one of these.
    Or inverting it, take any Prime Number to infinity, divide this P by Int(P/210)=Block.reference or Shift;
    Take this Block.Shift and subtract from the starting Prime P, this will give the OFFSET.
    There can only ever be 42 VARIETIES of Prime Number.
    All other Primes are Block.Shift=210N + Offset where the OFFSET is one of the 42 values.
    CJW
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  2. #2
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    Re: Prime Numbers

    Thanks from topsquark
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    Re: Prime Numbers

    Okay, I'll bite. Isn't 211 prime? That isn't 210 times anything.

    -Dan
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  4. #4
    CJW
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    Re: Prime Numbers

    Yes and so now you can understand that "1" must be Prime so make that 42 + 1 since 211 is {(210*1)+1)} Check all others to infinity
    No they can all be reduced to 210N block shift + Offset where offset = one of the (42 varieties + "1")

    211 Block shift= 1 210 Offset= 1
    421 Block shift= 2 420 Offset= 1
    631 Block shift= 3 630 Offset= 1
    1051 Block shift= 5 1050 Offset= 1
    1471 Block shift= 7 1470 Offset= 1
    2311 Block shift= 11 2310 Offset= 1
    all others
    1046641 Block shift= 4984 1046640 Offset= 1


    CJW
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    Re: Prime Numbers

    $191 = 0\cdot 210 + 191$

    $191 \not \in \{\text{set of first 42 primes}\}$
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    Re: Prime Numbers

    CJW, you seem to be using "prime" in a non-standard sense. What is your definition of "prime"?
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  7. #7
    CJW
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    Re: Prime Numbers

    No not 0.210 ---- the integer 210 and all Primes really are 210*N +offset where N is some integer and 210 is the Block Shift --- Plus one of the 42 + "1" {total 43} only possible varieties of offset. The offsets are
    1 11 13 17 19 23 29 31 37 41 43 47 53 59 61 67 71 73 79 83 89 97 101 103 107 109 113 127 131 137 139 149 151 157 163 167 173 179 181 191 193 197 199.
    No, you can NOT go up --- not all 210*N+Offset are Prime. However, take any Prime P --- compute the Block.shift=Int(P/210); Now subtract 210*Block.shift to obtain the offset and you really will find that there are only 42 + "1" {or 43 if you prefer} varieties of Prime Number. All Primes are of the form 210N + {one of the 43 offset}
    CJW
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  8. #8
    CJW
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    Re: Prime Numbers

    Prime is normal usage --- a number only divisible by self and "1".
    CJW
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    Re: Prime Numbers

    No not 0.210
    note that $0 \cdot 210$ is not the decimal 0.210 ... the "dot" indicates a product zero times 210
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  10. #10
    CJW
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    Re: Prime Numbers

    Now your starting to think, but still haven't got it. Here's a bit more. To the Prime Numbers 42 + "1" you also need to add back into the Trinity Terms from
    11*11=121; 11*13=143; and 13*13=169. This Trinity of Values which stem from the Twin Pair 11/13 are NOT taken out by the Twin Prime Filter generated by the twin Pair 5,7.

    1 11 13 17 19 23 29 31 37 41 43 47 53 59 61 67 71 73 79 83 89 97 101 103 107 109 113 121 127 131 137 139 143 149 151 157 163 167 169 173 179 181 191 193 197 199.
    Therefore you can see that you need to add back in the 3 NON Prime Number 121,143,169 giving a GRAND total {when 1 is included of 46 Varieties}
    All Prime will adhere to Block.Shift=210 Offset= one of the 46 Varieties 42 of which are starting Primes, plus "1" plus 3 non-Primes.
    Beyond this 46 there are no others.
    As said take any Prime and divide by Block=P/(int(210*N)) Offset = P minus (210*Block)
    No, you can not generate Prime using this.
    Yes, all Primes DO INDEED refer back to one of the 46 varieties
    If you make Block=0 then (Block*0)=0 Plus one of the 46.offset does work, but you can NOT generate Primes.
    However, take any PRIME I.e. exclude 121,143,169 and they will generate Block=0 using Block=int(P/210)
    CJW
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    Re: Prime Numbers

    Quote Originally Posted by CJW View Post
    Prime is normal usage --- a number only divisible by self and "1".CJW
    Note that if that definition is used then one is a prime, because 1 divides one and 1 itself divides one, so one is divisible by only 1 and itself.

    What about this: a positive integer is prime if and only if it has exactly two positive integer divisors.
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    Re: Prime Numbers

    Quote Originally Posted by CJW View Post
    Now your starting to think, but still haven't got it. Here's a bit more. To the Prime Numbers 42 + "1" you also need to add back into the Trinity Terms from
    11*11=121; 11*13=143; and 13*13=169. This Trinity of Values which stem from the Twin Pair 11/13 are NOT taken out by the Twin Prime Filter generated by the twin Pair 5,7.

    1 11 13 17 19 23 29 31 37 41 43 47 53 59 61 67 71 73 79 83 89 97 101 103 107 109 113 121 127 131 137 139 143 149 151 157 163 167 169 173 179 181 191 193 197 199.
    Therefore you can see that you need to add back in the 3 NON Prime Number 121,143,169 giving a GRAND total {when 1 is included of 46 Varieties}
    All Prime will adhere to Block.Shift=210 Offset= one of the 46 Varieties 42 of which are starting Primes, plus "1" plus 3 non-Primes.
    Beyond this 46 there are no others.
    As said take any Prime and divide by Block=P/(int(210*N)) Offset = P minus (210*Block)
    No, you can not generate Prime using this.
    Yes, all Primes DO INDEED refer back to one of the 46 varieties
    If you make Block=0 then (Block*0)=0 Plus one of the 46.offset does work, but you can NOT generate Primes.
    However, take any PRIME I.e. exclude 121,143,169 and they will generate Block=0 using Block=int(P/210)
    CJW
    thanks for playing, can we have the next contestant Johnny.
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