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Math Help - How close to Fermat's theorem?

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by wonderboy1953 View Post
    I thought you were claiming that no multigrade of level>2 can be "dotted" with another vector, and create another multigrade of level>2. First I never brought up vectors in any of my posts on this thread. I'm talking about dotting with consecutive numbers 1,2,3,4... (if it's a 2-termed multigrade on both sides of the equal sign, a^n + b^n = c^n + d^n, then I would dot with 1 and 2 with the multigrade arranged from lowest to highest numbers on both sides of the equal sign; if it's a 3-termed multigrade on both sides of the equal sign, a^n + b^n + c^n = d^n + e^n + f^n, then I would dot with 1,2,3 with the multigrade going from lowest to highest numbers on both sides of the equal sign, the number of consecutive numbers I dot with depends on the number of terms on either side of the multigrade).

    I should point out that I would add a 0 to a multigrade to make it symmetric because the chances of my observation about equality to the second power improves when you do so. E.g. if you have a multigrade: a^n + b^n = c^n + d^n + e^n, then add a 0 to the left side to make it 0^n + a^n + b^n = c^n + d^n + e^n and dot multiply with 1,2,3 because you've made a three-termed multigrade on both sides of the equal sign.

    A demonstration: when you have this bigrade, 4^n + 9^n + 2^n = 8^n + 1^n + 6^n for n = 1,2, rearrange from lowest to highest: 2^n + 4^n + 9^n = 1^n + 6^n + 8^n and dot multiply with 1,2,3 to get:
    1 x 2^n + 2 x 4^n + 3 x 9^n = 1 x 1^n + 2 x 6^n + 3 x 8^n, you will see that you get equality for only n = 1.

    Another demo: I mentioned earlier about the trigrade 2,9,15,8 and 3,5,14,12. Rearrange the numbers to 2,8,9,15 and 3,5,12,14 and dot multiply with 1,2,3,4 to get: 1 x 2^n + 2 x 8^n + 3 x 9^n + 4 x 15^n =
    1 x 3^n + 2 x 5^n + 3 x 12^n + 4 x 14^n which is true for n = 1,2.
    I've checked a number of multigrades with dot multiplication on the consecutive numbers and n never goes above 2 to have equality just like Fermat's equation also never has equality when n goes above 2. (btw even if you do have symmetric multigrades with its terms arranged from lowest to highest doesn't guarantee equality for n = 1 or n = 2 which also corresponds to FLT).

    Would like to mention to Media_Man that I find 16,4,4,1 interesting and I thank him for his input for using his computer.

    I would recommend reading Simon Singh's "Fermat's Enigma" particularly where it was proven that elliptic equations and modular forms are the same
    (and I feel that my observation relates to this).

    Well, where it was proved that (semistable) elliptic and modular forms are the same is in the work of Wiles when he proved FLT: this is the modern form of the celebrated Taniyama-Shimura Conjecture and which was proved to be equivalent to FLT, mostly by Serre and Ribet, though already proposed by Frey.
    Perhaps Singh mentions this result (I've had the book for long months but haven't just had the necessary will to read it, in spite of working myself some time ago with modular forms, elliptic curves and related stuff ).
    Anyway, a clear, neat and easy-to-read presentation can make wonders to get people itnerested in your work.

    Tonio
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  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by wonderboy1953 View Post
    "I cannot enlighten you with my derivation of this result. I took my own advice and let a computer sift through thousands of candidates and that is one that popped up." You have already enlightened me. I hope I have enlightened you.

    BTW I have came up with another method for making a multigrade two days ago starting with another multigrade which I'll demonstrate with the base numbers:

    2,8,15,9 = 3,5,14,12 (a trigrade), go from right to left and add numbers that are next to each other - the end numbers add the numbers on the far left:

    10^n + 23^n+ 24^n + 11^n = 8^n+19^n + 26^n + 15^n which is valid for n = 1,2,3. Simple algebra will show why this method works.

    I want to thank you for helping me out with your computer (incidentally I know about half a dozen methods for making multigrades. I refrain from going into this because I don't know if the purpose of this website is for recreational math or more serious math such as helping out with homework problems - if you read the book I mentioned, you'll see why I posted my findings here as it seems to be of major importance to mathematics)

    It can be a year before I get a home computer. In the meantime I look forward to your computer help, but the best thing would be to prove or disprove my conjecture. (thank you too Tonio)
    This thread has got to the point where it is now beyond the scope of the purpose of MHF. I'm therefore closing the thread. By all means continue developing your theories, but find an alternative avenue for doing so.

    As a sidenote, I will remind members not to pm to solicit help etc. This can make people feel uncomfortable and it's against forum rules.
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