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Math Help - I M Gelfand 1913–2009

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    I M Gelfand 1913–2009

    Yesterday's Guardian has a whole-page obituary of Israel Gelfand, who died last month.

    Israel Gelfand obituary | Science | The Guardian

    Gelfand and his collaborator Mark Naimark, along with John von Neumann, were the founders of the theory of operator algebras (of which my username is an abbreviation). This has developed into one of the more active strands of mathematical research in the past half century, with important applications in noncommutative geometry, knot theory, quantum field theory, quantum statistical mechanics and the representation theory of topological groups.

    I met Gelfand a few years ago, at the International Congress of Mathematics. His mind was as sharp as ever, although by then he was well into his nineties. He was eagerly listening to young mathematicians explaining their work to him, and giving them ideas and advice.
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    MHF Contributor Drexel28's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opalg View Post
    Yesterday's Guardian has a whole-page obituary of Israel Gelfand, who died last month.

    Israel Gelfand obituary | Science | The Guardian

    Gelfand and his collaborator Mark Naimark, along with John von Neumann, were the founders of the theory of operator algebras (of which my username is an abbreviation). This has developed into one of the more active strands of mathematical research in the past half century, with important applications in noncommutative geometry, knot theory, quantum field theory, quantum statistical mechanics and the representation theory of topological groups.

    I met Gelfand a few years ago, at the International Congress of Mathematics. His mind was as sharp as ever, although by then he was well into his nineties. He was eagerly listening to young mathematicians explaining their work to him, and giving them ideas and advice.
    e^{\pi}?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drexel28 View Post
    e^{\pi}?
    No, e^\pi is associated with Alexander Gelfond, a different mathematician. Gelfond died in 1968.
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    MHF Contributor Drexel28's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opalg View Post
    No, e^\pi is associated with Alexander Gelfond, a different mathematician. Gelfond died in 1968.
    I'm sorry. My mistake.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opalg View Post
    I met Gelfand a few years ago, at the International Congress of Mathematics. His mind was as sharp as ever, although by then he was well into his nineties. He was eagerly listening to young mathematicians explaining their work to him, and giving them ideas and advice.
    I am always jealous when people say these sorts of things.
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    MHF Contributor arbolis's Avatar
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    A sad news.
    I first thought you were talking about Boris Gelfand (The chess games of Boris Gelfand), from Israel. Also the I M in the title reminded me of International Master, although Gelfand is a GM.
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    MHF Contributor Drexel28's Avatar
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    I know this is an obscene amount of time later, but I would like to comment that know that I am slightly wiser I appreciate Gelfand for the kind of mathematician he was. I mean, everything has his name attached. Non Comm Geo, x\mapsto\hat{x}, and he even authored the book I'm using on calc of variations. Profound man to say the least.
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    there's a very important concept in dimension theory of (non)commuative algebras called GK-dimension. the G stands for Gelfand and the K for one of his students, i.e. Kirillov.
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    Junior Member DIOGYK's Avatar
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    Re: I M Gelfand 1913–2009

    It's so sad, I'm reading his book on algebra now and he is awesome teacher.
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