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Math Help - centripetal force

  1. #1
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    centripetal force

    when an object moves in a circle (circular motion ) , i know that there is a force acting towards the direction of the centripetal acceleration , the centripetal force .
    So according to Newton's 3rd law , there must be a force acting outwards so that these 2 forces would be balance .

    My question is what this force is ?

    I am still unclear with the concepts so please forgive me if i just asked a stupid question .
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by thereddevils View Post
    when an object moves in a circle (circular motion ) , i know that there is a force acting towards the direction of the centripetal acceleration , the centripetal force .
    So according to Newton's 3rd law , there must be a force acting outwards so that these 2 forces would be balance .

    My question is what this force is ?

    I am still unclear with the concepts so please forgive me if i just asked a stupid question .
    The full statement of Newton's Third Law is:

    "The force exerted BY object A UPON object B is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the force exerted BY object B UPON object A."

    Consider a ball attached to a string that is moving in a circle at constant speed. The force exerted by the string on the ball is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the force exerted by the ball on the string.

    Think about this.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr fantastic View Post
    The full statement of Newton's Third Law is:

    "The force exerted BY object A UPON object B is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the force exerted BY object B UPON object A."

    Consider a ball attached to a string that is moving in a circle at constant speed. The force exerted by the string on the ball is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the force exerted by the ball on the string.

    Think about this.
    Thanks . That makes sense . Its the tension of the string .

    Just out of curiousity , if a motorcylist is going round a curved track , i know the centripetal force is provided by the friction between the tyres and the road , but this time i don think there is a tension ?? is there ??
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by thereddevils View Post
    So according to Newton's 3rd law , there must be a force acting outwards so that these 2 forces would be balance .
    Quote Originally Posted by thereddevils View Post
    Just out of curiousity , if a motorcylist is going round a curved track , i know the centripetal force is provided by the friction between the tyres and the road , but this time i don think there is a tension ?? is there ??

    In case a ball attached to a string, the force on the string by the ball is balanced by the force on the ball by the string.

    In case of a motorcylist is going round a curved track, the force by the road on the tyres is balanced by the force on the road by the tyres.
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