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Math Help - Assistance is needed.

  1. #1
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    Assistance is needed.

    n
    2=n+1

    can you help me solve this?
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by gedprep View Post
    n
    2=n+1

    can you help me solve this?
    This is an addition equation because a value has been added to the variable n.
    To isolate the variable (get the variable by itself on one side of the equation),
    you must perform the inverse of addition (subtraction) on the value.

    2=n+1

    Subtract 1 from both sides

    2-1=n+1-1

    1=n

    \boxed{n=1}
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  3. #3
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    I made a mistake.

    I am sorry but tis was 2 over n equals n plus 1
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by gedprep View Post
    I am sorry but tis was 2 over n equals n plus 1
    \frac{2}{n}=n+1

    First, multiply each term by n

    2=n^2+n

    Now, set the equation = 0

    n^2+n-2=0

    Now, factor the trinomial

    (n+2)(n-1)=0

    Using the zero product property that says "If ab=0, then a=0 or b=0",

    n+2=0 \ \ or \ \ n-1=0

    n=-2 \ \ or \ \ n=1
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  5. #5
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    That error is my fault and I corrected it already. Check it out

    I am sorry but it is n over 2 equals n plus 1


    not 2 over n
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by gedprep View Post
    I am sorry but it is n over 2 equals n plus 1


    not 2 over n
    Third time's the charm...

    \frac{n}{2}=n+1

    Multiply all terms by 2 (in order to eliminate the fraction)

    n=2n+2

    Subtract 2n from each side.

    -n=2

    Multiply everything by -1.

    n=-2
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  7. #7
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    Re: Assistance is needed

    why must you multiply the 1 as well as the number n?
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by gedprep View Post
    why must you multiply the 1 as well as the number n?
    One of the 10 commandants of math is:

    Thou shalt do unto one side of an equation what thou doest to the other.

    If I multiply 2 times one term in an equation, I must multiply 2 times every term in the equation.


    Example:


    \frac{x}{2}+3=2x-1


    Multiple all terms by 2.


    {\color{red}2}\left(\frac{x}{2}\right)+{\color{red  }2}(3)={\color{red}2}(2x)-{\color{red}2}(1)
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