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Math Help - Proof by induction.

  1. #1
    Super Member Showcase_22's Avatar
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    Proof by induction.

    I tried this last night and i'm looking at it this mornng. I'm still stuck on a bit of it:

    Observe that:

    1=1
    1-4=-(1+2)
    1-4+9=1+2+3
    1-4+9-16=-(1+2+3+4)

    Guess the general law and prove it by induction.
    My method is like this:

    1-2^2+3^2-4^2+.........-(n-1)^2+n^2=(-1)^{n+1}(\frac{n}{2})(2+(n-1))

    1-2^2+3^2-4^2+..........-(n-1)^2+n^2=(-1)^{n+1}(\frac{n}{2})(n+1)

    For n=1:

    1^2=(-1)^2(\frac{1}{2})(2)

    1=1

    Hence true for n=1.

    Assume true for n=k:

    1-2^2+3^2-4^2+..........-(k-1)^2+k^2=(-1)^{k+1}(\frac{k}{2})(k+1)

    For n=k+1:

    1-2^2+3^2-4^2+..........-k^2+(k+1)^2=(-1)^{k+2}(\frac{k+1}{2})(k+2)

    1-2^2+3^2-4^2+..........+(k-1)^2-k^2+(k+1)^2=(-1)^{k+2}(\frac{1}{2})(k^2+3k+2)

    1-2^2+3^2-4^2+........+(k-1)^2-k^2+(k+1)^2=(-1)^{k+2}(\frac{1}{2})(k)(k+1)+(-1)^{k+2}(\frac{1}{2})(2k+2)

    1-2^2+3^2-4^2+.........+(k-1)^2-k^2+(k+1)^2=-(-1)^{k+1}(\frac{1}{2})(k)(k+1)-(-1)^{k+1}(k+1)

    At this point it's clear that the LHS does not equal the right RHS. This implies that my initial expression for the sum is incorrect. However, it works for n=1 and n=2 so I think it's right.

    Can anyone see what i'm doing wrong?
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  2. #2
    Super Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Showcase_22 View Post
    I tried this last night and i'm looking at it this mornng. I'm still stuck on a bit of it:



    My method is like this:

    1-2^2+3^2-4^2+.........-(n-1)^2+n^2=(-1)^{n+1}(\frac{n}{2})(2+(n-1))

    1-2^2+3^2-4^2+..........-(n-1)^2+n^2=(-1)^{n+1}(\frac{n}{2})(n+1)

    ...
    In my opinion you must use the factor (-1)^{n+1} at the LHS too. Otherwise you must examine the equation for 2 different cases: n is even or n is odd.
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  3. #3
    Super Member Showcase_22's Avatar
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    How do you mean?

    Like this:

    1-2^2+3^2-4^2+..........+(-1)^{n+1}(n-1)^2+(-1)^{n+1}n^2=(-1)^{n+1}(\frac{n}{2})(n+1)

    ?
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  4. #4
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    Exactly, since each even term has a negative sign in front of it which must be taken into account.
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  5. #5
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    Hello, Showcase_22!


    We have: . 1^2 - 2^3 + 3^2 - 4^2 + \cdots + (\text{-}1)^{n-1}n^2 \;=\;(\text{-}1)^{n-1}\frac{n(n+1)}{2}

    Verify S(1)\!:\quad (\text{-}1)^01^2 \:=\:(\text{-}1)^0\frac{1(2)}{2} . . . True

    Assume S(k)\!:\quad 1^2 - 2^2 + 3^2 - 4^2 + \cdots + (\text{-}1)^{k-1}k^2 \;=\;(\text{-}1)^{k-1}\frac{k(k+1)}{2}


    Add (\text{-}1)^k(k+1)^2 to both sides.

    . . \underbrace{1^2-2^2+3^2 - 4^2 + \cdots + {\color{blue}(\text{-}1)^k(k+1)^2}}_{\text{Left side of }S(k+1)}    \;=\;(\text{-}1)^{k-1}\frac{k(k+1)}{2} + {\color{blue}(\text{-}1)^k(k+1)^2}


    We must show that the right side is the right side of S(k+1)
    . . which looks like this: . (\text{-}1)^k\frac{(k+1)(k+2)}{2}


    The right side is: . (\text{-}1)^{k-1}\frac{k(k+1)}{2} + (\text{-}1)^k(k+1)^2

    Factor: . (\text{-}1)^{k-1}\cdot\frac{k+1}{2}\cdot\bigg[k + (\text{-}1)2(k+1)\bigg] \;=\;(-1)^{k-1}\cdot\frac{k+1}{2}\cdot[-k-2]

    Factor: . (\text{-}1)^{k-1}\cdot\frac{k+1}{2}\cdot(\text{-}1)\cdot(k+2) \;=\;(\text{-}1)^k\cdot\frac{k+1}{2}\cdot(k+2)

    . . And we have: . (\text{-}1)^k\frac{(k+1)(k+2)}{2}\quad\hdots\quad \text{ta-}DAA!<br />

    The inductive proof is complete.

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  6. #6
    Super Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Showcase_22 View Post
    How do you mean?

    Like this:

    1-2^2+3^2-4^2+..........+(-1)^{n+1}(n-1)^2+(-1)^{n+1}n^2=(-1)^{n+1}(\frac{n}{2})(n+1)

    ?
    Quite. The exponent of the factor (-1)^{n+1} is exactly greater than n by 1. Therefore the LHS should be:

    1-2^2+3^2-4^2+..........+(-1)^{\bold{{\color{red}n}}}(n-1)^2+(-1)^{n+1}n^2=(-1)^{n+1}(\frac{n}{2})(n+1)
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  7. #7
    Senior Member bkarpuz's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Grouping terms

    I would like to give a different way for the proof.
    It is not by induction, its by direct computation.
    This may be useful for other problems.

    We want to prove that
    \sum\limits_{j=1}^{n}(-1)^{j+1}j^{2}=(-1)^{n}\sum\limits_{j=1}^{n}j=(-1)^{n}\frac{n(n+1)}{2} for any n\in\mathbb{N}.
    I will only consider the case where n\in\mathbb{N} is odd because the case where n is even is very similar.
    Since n is odd, we may find k\in\mathbb{N} such that n=2k-1 holds.
    \sum\limits_{j=1}^{2k-1}(-1)^{j+1}j^{2}=1+\sum\limits_{j=1}^{k-1}\big[(2j+1)^{2}-(2j)^{2}\big]
    .................... =1+\sum\limits_{j=1}^{k-1}\big[(2j+1)^{2}-(2j)^{2}\big]
    .................... =1+\sum\limits_{j=1}^{k-1}\big[4j+1\big]
    .................... =k+4\sum\limits_{j=1}^{k-1}j
    .................... =k+4\frac{(k-1)k}{2}
    .................... =\frac{2k}{2}+\frac{(2k-2)2k}{2}
    .................... =\frac{(2k-1)2k}{2}
    .................... =\frac{n(n+1)}{2}.
    Hence the proof for this case is completed.
    Let n be even and pick k\in\mathbb{N} to satisfy n=2k.
    Then, we have
    \sum\limits_{j=1}^{2k}(-1)^{j+1}j^{2}=-\sum\limits_{j=1}^{k}\big[(2j)^{2}-(2j-1)^{2}\big].
    The rest is similar.
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  8. #8
    Super Member Showcase_22's Avatar
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    Oh WOW!

    I wasn't expecting quite so much help. I was trying it myself and I was still getting a bit stuck on it (my typo when I wrote (-1)^{n+1} was really throwing me).

    Anyway, thanks a bundle. I'm going to attempt this question and solve it like there's no tomorrow!!!

    After trying and SUCESSFULLY solved the problem: I used a method similar to Soroban's except I did it a little differently:

    (-1)^k \frac{(k+1)(k+2)}{2}+(-1)^k(k+1)^2-(-1)^k (k+1)^2

    After a lot of working you end up with the required result (edit: I just noticed this is exactly what Soroban did. Rather than add it to both sides I added it to the same side).

    I like your method bkarpuz. Direct computation is a method I haven't heard of before. It took me a few read-throughs but I finally got it. =D
    Last edited by Showcase_22; October 4th 2008 at 11:22 AM.
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  9. #9
    Senior Member bkarpuz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Showcase_22 View Post
    Oh WOW!

    I wasn't expecting quite so much help. I was trying it myself and I was still getting a bit stuck on it (my typo when I wrote (-1)^{n+1} was really throwing me).

    Anyway, thanks a bundle. I'm going to attempt this question and solve it like there's no tomorrow!!!

    After trying and SUCESSFULLY solved the problem: I used a method similar to Soroban's except I did it a little differently:

    (-1)^k \frac{(k+1)(k+2)}{2}+(-1)^k(k+1)^2-(-1)^k (k+1)^2

    After a lot of working you end up with the required result.

    I like your method bkarpuz. Direct computation is a method I haven't heard of before. It took me a few read-throughs but I finally got it. =D
    Direct computation is not a method, its just calculating the desired identity directly by using well-known identities.
    However, you may not always come across with a known one and you may need to provide your own (new) identities.
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