Results 1 to 3 of 3

Math Help - how to compute work

  1. #1
    Newbie
    Joined
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2

    how to compute work

    hello all and thank you for reading this. any and all help will be greatly appreciated. i am trying figure out if air pressure can be converted to horsepower.

    i know what 1 horsepower is equal to in the sense of work performed. although horsepower does seem to be a rather vague way of describing work. what has me backwards is if the energy created by air pressure can be coverted over to horsepower.

    so if x amount of air pressure pushes down on a y size piston how much energy can be transfered through the piston?

    if none of this makes sense let e know and i'll try to explain better. it seems easy to think about but for some reason just has me all confused when i try to solve it.

    thank you
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    Grand Panjandrum
    Joined
    Nov 2005
    From
    someplace
    Posts
    14,972
    Thanks
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by jmurphy View Post
    hello all and thank you for reading this. any and all help will be greatly appreciated. i am trying figure out if air pressure can be converted to horsepower.

    i know what 1 horsepower is equal to in the sense of work performed. although horsepower does seem to be a rather vague way of describing work. what has me backwards is if the energy created by air pressure can be coverted over to horsepower.
    Horsepower is a rate of doing work, not work itself.

    so if x amount of air pressure pushes down on a y size piston how much energy can be transfered through the piston?
    It depends on the pressure on the otherside of the piston. In a rational set
    of units the work done is the nett force times the distance moved by the point of
    application.

    Unfortunatly horse power is not part of a rational set of units and you will
    have to work in Watts, metres and Newtons which are the relevant SI units
    if you want to make this simple.

    Watts are Joules per second which are Newton metres per second, and a
    Newton is a kg metre per second per second.

    RonL
    Last edited by CaptainBlack; April 29th 2008 at 08:06 PM.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    Newbie
    Joined
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2

    wankels perfect design

    thank you for the input. a piston was a poor example on my part, i apologize.

    if your familiar with a wabkel design of engine using a rotor that spins rather, than pistons, a negative pressure or slight vaccuum could be created on the back side of the mass being moved requiring less energy to move the rotor.
    so if we stayed somewhat simple and used a 1 square inch surface area with 100 lbs of pressure on a rotating mass of say 10 lbs is there a g-wiz great math formula to solve the amount of being done.

    i know many things do come into play, friction loss for example. i may be looking for a mathmatical answer to a physical problem, if so thats the breaks. nice catch on the horsepower, is is a horrible way to figure work being done but its my first math question in a long time. should have considered who would be giving me answers.

    i kind of think of it like a pinwheel. considering the mass the wheel and its resistance to move can i use mathe to find how much aie pressure is required to move the wheel?
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Compute p(A) where p(x) = ...?
    Posted in the Advanced Algebra Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: September 6th 2011, 09:27 PM
  2. Work compute with integral
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: May 14th 2008, 01:13 PM
  3. Compute
    Posted in the Math Topics Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: April 19th 2008, 02:14 AM
  4. Compute N...
    Posted in the Algebra Forum
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: May 11th 2007, 04:47 AM
  5. compute a sum
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: August 7th 2006, 10:32 AM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum