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Thread: Central Standard Time (CST)

  1. #1
    Super Member harpazo's Avatar
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    Central Standard Time (CST)

    The current time is 12 noon CST. What time (CST) will it be 12, 997 hours from now?

    Let me see...

    Note: 12 noon means 1/2 of 24 hours.

    1. Must I add 12 hours to 12, 997 hours?
    2. If step 1 is correct, what should I do next?
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  2. #2
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    Re: Central Standard Time (CST)

    One method for helping you solve problems is to simplify the problem at first.


    Could you answer these:

    The current time is 12 noon CST. What time (CST) will it be 25 hours from now?

    The current time is 12 noon CST. What time (CST) will it be 26 hours from now?

    The current time is 12 noon CST. What time (CST) will it be 50 hours from now?

    Now try the original problem again.
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    Re: Central Standard Time (CST)

    There are 24 hours in a day. If you divide 12,997 by 24 what is the remainder? What does that tell you?
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    Super Member harpazo's Avatar
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    Re: Central Standard Time (CST)

    Quote Originally Posted by Debsta View Post
    One method for helping you solve problems is to simplify the problem at first.


    Could you answer these:

    The current time is 12 noon CST. What time (CST) will it be 25 hours from now?

    The current time is 12 noon CST. What time (CST) will it be 26 hours from now?

    The current time is 12 noon CST. What time (CST) will it be 50 hours from now?

    Now try the original problem again.

    The current time is 12 noon CST. What time (CST) will it be 25 hours from now?

    Well, 24 hours from now will be 12 noon the next day. If one more hour is added, we arrive at 1 pm the next day.

    The current time is 12 noon CST. What time (CST) will it be 26 hours from now?

    Note: 24 hours from 12 noon today takes use to 12 noon tomorrow. Adding two more hours we arrive at 2pm the next day.

    The current time is 12 noon CST. What time (CST) will it be 50 hours from now?

    12 noon today + 50 hours takes us to 2 days later plus 2 hours. That is, we arrive at 2pm two days later.
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  5. #5
    Super Member harpazo's Avatar
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    Re: Central Standard Time (CST)

    Quote Originally Posted by HallsofIvy View Post
    There are 24 hours in a day. If you divide 12,997 by 24 what is the remainder? What does that tell you?
    12,997 24 = 541, remainder 13. The remainder tells me nothing.
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    Re: Central Standard Time (CST)

    Quote Originally Posted by harpazo View Post
    The current time is 12 noon CST. What time (CST) will it be 12, 997 hours from now?
    Quote Originally Posted by harpazo View Post
    12,997 24 = 541, remainder 13. The remainder tells me nothing.
    Beg your pardon, it tell you every thing. Thirteen hours from noon is 1am.
    Now this does not adjust for daylight saving time changes.
    We would have gone through 541 twenty-four hour plus thirteen more hours.
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    Super Member harpazo's Avatar
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    Re: Central Standard Time (CST)

    Quote Originally Posted by Plato View Post
    Beg your pardon, it tell you every thing. Thirteen hours from noon is 1am.
    Now this does not adjust for daylight saving time changes.
    We would have gone through 541 twenty-four hour plus thirteen more hours.
    After dividing, I did not know what to do with the decimal number.

    You said:

    "We would have gone through 541 twenty-four hour plus thirteen more hours."

    So, 541 twenty-four hours = 541 days later
    Of course, we must add 13 more hours taking us to 1 am over one year later.
    Last edited by harpazo; Mar 4th 2019 at 08:54 PM.
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  8. #8
    Super Member harpazo's Avatar
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    Re: Central Standard Time (CST)

    Plato:

    I did not know that the remainder of 13 describes hours.
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    Re: Central Standard Time (CST)

    Quote Originally Posted by harpazo View Post
    Plato: I did not know that the remainder of 13 describes hours.
    Pray tell. what else could the the 13 represent?
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  10. #10
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    Re: Central Standard Time (CST)

    Quote Originally Posted by Plato View Post
    Pray tell. what else could the the 13 represent?
    I thought 13 represented minutes or seconds.
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    Re: Central Standard Time (CST)

    Quote Originally Posted by harpazo View Post
    I thought 13 represented minutes or seconds.
    Go back to the 3 leading questions I gave you in post #2.

    1. When you divide 25 hours by 24, the remainder is 1 hour.
    2. When you divide 26 hours by 24, the remainder is 2 hours.
    3. When you divide 50 hours by 24, the remainder is 2 hours.


    The process is the same for 12 997 hours.

    12 997 hours /24 = 541.541666... hours = 541 full days + 0.541666..days = 541 days + 0.541666 x 24 hours = 541 days + 13 hours.

    In other words, 12 997 hours = 541 x 24 + 13 hours.


    I think the red shows where you had a problem.
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  12. #12
    Super Member harpazo's Avatar
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    Re: Central Standard Time (CST)

    Quote Originally Posted by Debsta View Post
    Go back to the 3 leading questions I gave you in post #2.

    1. When you divide 25 hours by 24, the remainder is 1 hour.
    2. When you divide 26 hours by 24, the remainder is 2 hours.
    3. When you divide 50 hours by 24, the remainder is 2 hours.


    The process is the same for 12 997 hours.

    12 997 hours /24 = 541.541666... hours = 541 full days + 0.541666..days = 541 days + 0.541666 x 24 hours = 541 days + 13 hours.

    In other words, 12 997 hours = 541 x 24 + 13 hours.


    I think the red shows where you had a problem.
    I answered your three questions.
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    Re: Central Standard Time (CST)

    Quote Originally Posted by harpazo View Post
    I answered your three questions.
    I know you did and you answered them correctly.

    I'm just trying to point out that the same method is applied for 12997 hours
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  14. #14
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    Re: Central Standard Time (CST)

    Quote Originally Posted by Debsta View Post
    I know you did and you answered them correctly.

    I'm just trying to point out that the same method is applied for 12997 hours
    Cool. More questions on my next day off (next Tuesday).
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