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Thread: Point for graph explanation

  1. #1
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    Point for graph explanation

    When we graph a points, it is different from y=ax+b(or y=x) as y=x is line but the point (x,y) is number so location for point is number. And sometimes, point(location) can be infinite series, so it is not number. And it means the math(graph) is not the real number for (x,y) point location as y for x is changing for y=x graph as line. So y=x graph is not kind like sequence equation (when it is point) but it is another method to understand math for number. So point(location) is not accurate number.
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  2. #2
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    Re: Point for graph explanation

    Quote Originally Posted by philipishin View Post
    When we graph a points, it is different from y=ax+b(or y=x) as y=x is line but the point (x,y) is number so location for point is number. And sometimes, point(location) can be infinite series, so it is not number. And it means the math(graph) is not the real number for (x,y) point location as y for x is changing for y=x graph as line. So y=x graph is not kind like sequence equation (when it is point) but it is another method to understand math for number. So point(location) is not accurate number.
    I can't tell whether you need English lessons or sessions with your math teacher. But the above paragraph is pretty much nonsense/gibberish. Show it to your math teacher and discuss it with him/her.
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    Re: Point for graph explanation

    I think I know what you're saying here, but I don't see a question in it. Let me see if I understand this correctly. You're saying the line or curve we get from an equation will be different depending on the equation. A point on that line is represented by numbers (x, y), but those numbers can change. When x is this, y is that, and y will be different depending on the value of x. So a graph of x and y doesn't give you a single answer like an equation can (x = whatever), it shows you what the equation looks like over a range. Is that correct?

    I disagree with your last sentence though. A point can be accurately represented by numbers. If I have the equation y = 3x, this will give me a line with infinite points. But I could ask "what is the coordinates of the point where x = 2?" The equation would tell me the y value is 6, so the coordinate is (2, 6), and the graph will confirm this.
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  4. #4
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    Re: Point for graph explanation

    Quote Originally Posted by philipishin View Post
    When we graph a points, it is different from y=ax+b(or y=x) as y=x is line but the point (x,y) is number so location for point is number.
    (x, y) is a pair of numbers, not "a number".

    And sometimes, point(location) can be infinite series, so it is not number.
    Can you give an example of this? It is not clear me what you mean by this. It is, of course, possible for a given point to be the limit of a sequence of points. And, again, a point in R2 is a pair of numbers, not a number.

    And it means the math(graph) is not the real number for (x,y) point location as y for x is changing for y=x graph as line. So y=x graph is not kind like sequence equation (when it is point) but it is another method to understand math for number. So point(location) is not accurate number.
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