Results 1 to 2 of 2

Math Help - Physics Gravity Problem

  1. #1
    Member
    Joined
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    209

    Physics Gravity Problem

    I am having a bit of trouble with this problem...

    The gravitational pull of the Moon is partially responsible for the tides of the sea. The Moon pulls on you, too, so if you are on a diet it is better to weigh yourself when this heavenly body is directly overhead! If you have a mass of 85.0 kg, how much less do you weigh if you factor in the force exerted by the Moon when it is directly overhead (compared to when it is just rising or setting)? Use the values 7.351022 kg for the mass of the moon, and 3.76108 m for its distance above the surface of the Earth.

    Thanks
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    Member
    Joined
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    91
    The gravitational force between two objects is given by the following formula:

    F = \frac{Gm_2m_2}{r^2}

    Where G is the gravitational constant, and r is the distance between the two masses.

    Just google for G and you should be able to apply this to get what you want.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. physics -gravity
    Posted in the Math Topics Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: October 30th 2010, 08:00 AM
  2. Equilibrium and Gravity problem #4
    Posted in the Math Topics Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: November 26th 2009, 01:09 PM
  3. Equilibrium and Gravity problem #2
    Posted in the Math Topics Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: November 25th 2009, 03:12 PM
  4. Physics, vertical kinematics, gravity
    Posted in the Math Topics Forum
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: September 18th 2008, 09:25 AM
  5. acceleration/gravity problem
    Posted in the Math Topics Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: January 26th 2007, 07:17 AM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum