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Math Help - Re:mechanics rigid objects in equilibrium

  1. #1
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    Re:mechanics rigid objects in equilibrium

    Re:mechanics rigid objects in equilibrium-pic_0911.jpg i know that the centre of mass should be at 20 degrees from the horizontal but why is it that it topples after turning it 20 degrees thanks
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  2. #2
    MHF Contributor ebaines's Avatar
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    Re: mechanics rigid objects in equilibrium

    The center of mass is located on a line that connects the lower left corner of the rhombus to the upper right. That line is at an angle of 70 degrees from the horizontal, or 20 degrees from the vertical (do you see whay that is?). If the prism is tilted 20 degrees, the center of mass is directly above the left corner; if it tilts any more than 20 degrees there is nothing to keep the prisn from toppling.
    Thanks from abdulrehmanshah
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  3. #3
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    Re: mechanics rigid objects in equilibrium

    darn me i thought we are turning it in z-axis lol thinking about 3-d structure and all thank you
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